fellows

Taeyoon Choi isn't at this Ikea, the second largest store location in the world, to buy a coffee table. He's not there for delicious meatballs and lingonberry sauce, either. He's in Ikea to create crazy-weird experimental noise machines.

 

Security cameras, RFID scanners, and GPS tracking have become ubiquitous to the point that privacy can be an imagined concept. According to one popular statistic, the average New York City resident is caught on surveillance camera 75 times a day. Eyebeam Fellow Mark Shepard has created the Sentient City Survival Kit, a toolkit of apps, gadgets, and tactics that anticipate and creatively counter-act urban environments that will soon be capable of predicting not only one’s location, but possibly actions or even thoughts. The smartphone application Serendipitor, playfully challenges the efficiency of GPS directions by deliberately guiding the user in a circuitous path. As a member of Eyebeam’s Urban Research group, Mark aims to explore the use of control technologies - not only security cameras and RFID scanners, but also concrete architecture - as an influence on the psyche of city and civilian.

 
Hours: 
3:00PM-6:00PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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A two-day presentation at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center allowing an inside look at current research and in-progress work. Open Studios is a chance to meet the amazing artists and creative technologists that make Eyebeam an exciting creative incubator of new ideas, new art, and new technology: Think, Make, Share.

FELLOWS
Fran Ilich
Mark Shepard
Mary Mattingly

Nova Jiang
Taeyoon Choi

Aaron Meyers

 

On November 16, Eyebeam's fellows, residents, and student residents gathered in the main space together with staff to present their works in progress.

Honorary Resident Hsing Wei presented proposals from Digital Teacher Corps, a partnership between Eyebeam and New Visions for Public Schools. Fellow Mary Mattingly presented in-progress images of her Wearable Homes and Flock Houses, along with images of past projects.

Members of Eyebeam's Student Residency Program also presented proposals of projects they will create during their year-long residencies. The five high school students will work together with residents and fellows in Eyebeam's state of the art facilities to create works of art and technology through the media of video production, dance, activism, game design, and textile technology.

File Download: 
 

Eye to Eyebeam is a series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows that includes interviews, photos, and other information on Eyebeam’s artists and creative technologists. It is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

 
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Eye To Eyebeam is a series on Eyebeam's residents and fellows. It includes interviews, photos, and other news and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro. These interactive posts offer visitors the opportunity to learn more about Eyebeam's diverse community of creative practitioners.

Each week, you'll see interviews profiling individual Eyebeamers. Artists who have already engaged in conversation about their projects include:

Project Created: 
September 2011
 

Eye to Eyebeam is a series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows that includes interviews, photos, and other information on Eyebeam’s artists and creative technologists. It is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

Alan Sondheim is a transmedia artist, a musician, a theorist, and a writer. In past interviews, he has described himself as falling “between” literature and the arts; similarly, his projects fall between real and virtual bodies and worlds. For nearly forty years, Alan has employed his talents in writing and art-making to produce books, videos, performances, and net art. Through prolific writing and art-making, Alan has worked on many projects that link philosophy, psychology, language, body, sexuality, and virtuality. Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro (virtually) sat down with Alan Sondheim to find out more about his past and current work.

 

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

From sound collages and virtual sculpture to his collaborative website gifpumper, Slava Balasanov’s projects are riotous, self-aware of their digital status. The Digit, an augmented reality sculpture of two connected thumbs, is only visible through an iPhone app, where it can be seen hovering over Union Square, its chrome surface mirroring the sky and ground. After making a few additions to gifpumper, Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro sat down with Slava for a chat about some of his past work.

Katherine DiPierro: What are you planning on doing during your residency?

 

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

For many years now, Matt Parker has been developing ways to redefine and subvert video games. Many of his physical games utilize interactive screens that represent participating players in unusual ways, such as his motion game Recurse, which was a finalist at Indiecade 2010. Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro, who’s still amazed how inexpensive it is to make your own 3D projector, sat down with Matt to chat about his work.

Katherine DiPierro: What projects will you be working on as part of your residency?

 
Projects: Eye To Eyebeam, Fellowships, Residencies
People: Katherine DiPierro, Matt Parker, Matthew Parker
Tags: fellows, interview, Katherine DiPierro, Matthew Parker, residents

Eyebeam's Fall 2011 season is underway! On September 19, a few of Eyebeam's many residents and fellows gathered for an informal "pause work" to discuss their planned projects, exchanged ideas and suggestions, and enjoy one of the first cool days of fall. Fellows present were Mark Shepard, Mary Mattingly, and Taeyoon Choi. Carrie Mae Rose and Alex Chen, both new residents for the fall, were also in attendance, as were Roddy Schrock, Associate Director: Creative Residencies, and Kyle Kessler, Eyebeam Production Assistant.

 
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