bio

Check out my latest work on Stranger Visions at Clocktower Gallery in lower Manhattan.

*side_view_faces_web

It’s open tues-fri noon to 5pm.

Lots of great press for the project in the past week:

 

Here are some nice pics Dan Phiffer took of my work-in-progress installation in the Eyebeam bookstore.

Click to view slideshow.

 

I am very happy to report that I am featured in this week’s science magazine! The magazine isn’t freely available online but I am posting just the little section on me here in case anyone is interested in reading it!

Facing the Genetic Future

Sitting in a therapist’s office, New York City artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg discovered a hair

lodged in a crack in the glass covering a painting on the wall. “I stared at it for an hour,”

she says. “I couldn’t stop wondering who it belonged to, and what I could find out about

that person.”

After reading a story in Science about the new field of forensic DNA phenotyping

 

So Manu Sporny (in)famously open sourced his genome by posting it to Github a year and a half ago and he writes extensively about his reasons on his website.

I downloaded his file and ran it through my Stranger Visions software today to generate my take on his face. You can see a side by side comparison of my generated face and his actual face (well pulled from google image search results) below.

 

I am still very much in the middle of my wetlab work for Stranger Visions but the software side – the part that takes DNA information and produces a 3d model of a face – is mostly complete. I thought I would talk a little bit about the software and the concept of inductive bias in this next installment on Stranger Visions. This is a slightly technical post but there is a kind of ethical question  at the end…

 

As many of you probably already know I have been working hard over the past 6 months on a new project Stranger Visions. I am working on the piece as a resident at Eyebeam and in collaboration with the DIY bio lab, Genspace in downtown Brooklyn. I recently gave a LISA talk describing this piece and I thought I would elaborate on some of the details from my presentation through a series of blog posts. In this post I will describe where the idea behind Stranger Visions  came from and how I am producing it in general terms. Future posts will delve into more details about lab work, 3d programming, 3d printing and ethics.

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In Stranger Visions artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material collected in public places. Working with the traces strangers unwittingly leave behind, Dewey-Hagborg calls attention to the impulse toward genetic determinism and the potential for a culture of genetic surveillance.

Project Created: 
May 2012
 
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