youth

Start Date: 
26 Apr 2011 - 7 May 2011
Cost: 
Free w/ Registration
Venue: 
Cooper Hewitt, Eyebeam, & Smart Design
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The Jell-O Mold Competition partnered with the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum and Eyebeam Art + Technology Center to take Jell-O on a whirlwind tour through New York City with a Jell-O Mold Workshop for high school students interested in food, design, and technology!

Student teams work with designers to develop and create molds using traditional techniques and 3-D printing technology to enter into the third annual Jell-O Mold Competition scheduled for June 25, 2011. Workshop sessions are hosted at Cooper-Hewitt, Eyebeam Art + Technology Center, and Smart Design. 3D printing materials at Eyebeam were generously provided by Stratasys.

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Hours: 
10AM–5PM
Cost: 
$20 includes materials, lunch and snack (low-income scholarship available)
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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SPRING BREAK DIGITAL ART WORKSHOP
for High School Girls

10AM-5PM // April 18 & April 19

High school girls will collaborate with Eyebeam Fellows Kaho Abe & Nova Jiang to create an interactive digital art installation that will be featured at Figment Festival, a 3-day public art festival taking place on NYC’s Governor's Island (June 10-12). Over the course of a 2-day workshop at Eyebeam, students will learn how to embed basic electronics into everyday objects to transform them into musical instruments.

 

This workshop is for creative young women between the ages of 14-18. No experience with technology required.

 
This event is closed to the public.
Start Date: 
18 Jan 2011
Hours: 
1PM–6PM
Cost: 
Private Workshop
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Contemporary Art Students from the University of Huddersfield in the UK participate in a half-day interactive mask workshop led by Eyebeam X-Lab resident David Jimison, where students develop their own interactive masks that explore issues of online identity. During the workshop, students design and decorate their masks, and then wire them with LEDs and el wire.  Through the maskmaking process and then interacting online while wearing them, students explore methods of augmenting online personas. At the workshop’s conclusion, students create a series of photographs for posting on various social networks, and engaging with people via video chat.

This was a private workshop, designed specifically for this visiting group. If you would like a workshop like this, email stephanie at eyebeam.org to inquire about costs and program structure.

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Book Details
Format: 
Paperback, 271 pages
Publication Date: 
March 2006
ISBN: 
9781904772286
Category: 
Instructional
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

Magic Moments is a collection of texts and images reflecting opinions and insights of artists working on creative projects with young people. It examines their motives and working processes, evaluating the importance of art as an instrument of social change. The book spans projects from the late 1960s to the present day and demonstrates how work with young people has often been central for many artists and is becoming increasingly legitimate as a field of practice.

 
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After School Atelier (ASA) is a semester-long program that provides NYC public high school and middle school students the opportunity to work in a studio environment and to develop new media art projects under the guidance of Eyebeam’s Teaching Artists.

This outreach program helps students to deconstruct media messages about teens by teaching digital imaging techniques, introducing them to guest-lecturing new media professionals, and engaging them with art and design issues. Each semester Eyebeam holds one class for High School students and one for Middle School students. Each class runs two days per week for 7 weeks, depending on the school schedule. The students are offered opportunities to work on projects cooperatively with the Arists-in Residence, professional mentors, ASA staff, and their peers.

 

 

NYC public school students between the ages of 13–18 are invited to spend their Thursday afternoons, from 3–6PM, at Eyebeam. Each month will feature a series of free hands-on workshops, starting at 4PM, where students will have the opportunity to work with different open-source software programs as used by artists and technologists.

Thursdays in May: Electronic Music Production with Eyebeam Resident Jace Clayton
Musician and writer Jace Clayton (aka DJ/rupture) will introduce students to electronic music production and sound design using a variety of open source and inexpensive audio software. Students will learn the basics of sampling, synthesis, beat programming, and FX processing as they develop a composition of their own.

 
Photo: www.adrianvecchio.com

Eyebeam is is pleased to announce this year's Girls Eye View program, which will feature a new collaboration with young women from Good Shepherd Services' residential program. Youth participants will collaborate with artist and Eyebeam alum Tali Hinkis (LoVid) in an eight-week program where they will draw on topics they are exploring through their relationship with Good Shepherd—such as sanctuary, self, loss, and future—to reimagine the classic PSA by creating animated GIFs made up of stylized text that transforms to tell a story.

 
Aaron Meyers

NYC public school students between the ages of 13–18 are invited to spend their Thursday afternoons, from 3–6PM, at Eyebeam. Each month will feature a series of free hands-on workshops, starting at 4PM, where students will have the opportunity to work with different open-source software programs as used by artists and technologists.

Thursdays in April: Moving Image Design with Eyebeam Fellow, Aaron Meyers. Designer and programmer Aaron Meyers will introduce students to Processing, a free open source tool to code interactive moving images. Students will learn the basics of writing code using a visual approach; focusing on interactivity, drawing, and motion while checking out examples of other artwork created with Processing.

 
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Lafiya Watson will be teaching middle school students from the Institute for Collaborative Education(ICE).

"Everyone has had perceptions and labels placed upon them, and often those labels are wrong. It is especially frustrating to deal with false perceptions when one is still in the process of figuring out his/her identity." Through a series of web art projects using Flash (online animation software) and Photoshop, this class gave students a chance to address and debunk those perceptions placed upon them, as well as embrace and create their own true sense of identity.

Project Created: 
September 2005
 
Projects: Youth Web Art Workshop
People: Lafiya Watson
Project Type: Web
Tags: youth, photoshop, flash
Book Details
Format: 
Hardcover, 432 pages
Publication Date: 
November 2009
ISBN: 
978-0262013369
Category: 
Media Theory
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

Conventional wisdom about young people's use of digital technology often equates generational identity with technology identity: today's teens seem constantly plugged in to video games, social networks sites, and text messaging. Yet there is little actual research that investigates the intricate dynamics of youth's social and recreational use of digital media. Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out fills this gap, reporting on an ambitious three-year ethnographic investigation into how young people are living and learning with new media in varied settings—at home, in after school programs, and in online spaces. By focusing on media practices in the everyday contexts of family and peer interaction, the book views the relationship of youth and new media not simply in terms of technology trends but situated within the broader structural conditions of childhood and the negotiations with adults that frame the experience of youth in the United States.

 
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