Chess

Last week, I installed Playing Duchamp — a Turbulence commission — at Futherfield Gallery for the “Made Real” show. The work is a net art piece, existing only on the web, which presented obvious difficulties in a gallery setup where: (1) people tend not to engage with an online chess game and (2) the gallery doesn’t want to give access to the operating system or other applications.

Here’s how we solved this. First, we used a monitor embedded in the wall and then placed a 5′ x 5′ white platform in front of it. Adding a step, a white chair and white table, made it so that the player crossed an invisible threshold, making them part of a “living sculpture”

 

For the Playing Duchamp project, I made custom 3D chess pieces to resemble Duchamp’s hard-carved originals.

The 3D-rendered versions (designed by Daisuke Imai):

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In the Playing Duchamp project, I have reprogrammed a chess computer to play like Marcel Duchamp, which anyone can play online.

 

I have just completed a new Turbulence Commission for a project called “Playing Duchamp,” where based on records of his chess games, I have programmed a chess computer to play like Marcel Duchamp. You can play Marcel Duchamp here.

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I’m looking for some beta-testers for “Playing Duchamp” — a new net art project.
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Working with 72 recorded games of Marcel Duchamp’s chess matches, I have created a computer program to play chess as if it were Duchamp. In a series of open challenges, I invite all artists, both skilled and unskilled at this classic game, to play against a Duchampian ghost.

You don’t need to know how to play chess well to try this out.

The official release for the project will be on November 30th. Stay tuned.

If interested, please email me at: lucky (at) kildall (dot) com

 
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