arambartholl

Social Media at The Pace Gallery assembles a group of artists responding to the internet, whether as a way of bringing people together, as an aesthetic influence, or as a state of affairs to regard skeptically and even satirize. Social Media takes a long view that starts in the 1960s with Robert Heinecken (the show’s one pre-internet artist), who altered magazines like Time and Mademoiselle with his own collages and put them back on supermarket racks for others to stumble on. Since Heinecken, the idea of pulling from, responding to, and feeding back into the media has become more commonplace – Twitter, Tumblr, conceptual art video games, supercuts, and super supercuts attest to the prevalence of Heinecken’s media interventionism.

 

On Monday night, we went to check out Speedshow, an internet cafe takeover staged by Evan Roth (whose work is at MoMA for “Talk To Me”) and curated by Aram Bartholl (of Dead Drops). It surprised me that traditional style internet cafes still exist and this one at 90 Bowery is a throwback to those from the ’90s and early 2000s, with tons of kids playing first person shooter video games. It’s in the basement of the building down a narrow staircase, lending further mystique in a neighborhood known for its secret underground passageways.

 

Dead Drops in NYC—A Video How-To
Tuesday January 25, 2011
IMG_0421-650x433

As part of his EYEBEAM residency in NYC, Aram Bartholl created "Dead Drops," an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space where USB flash drives are embedded into walls, buildings and curbs accessable to anybody in public space.

This is an interesting project that is the intersection of street art and technology, using public space as a way to communicate in a specific way with others.

 

Posted by Soulskill on Saturday October 30, @05:56PM
from the peer-to-peer-sneakernet dept.
Okian Warrior writes "Aram Bartholl is building a series of USB dead drops in New York City. Billed as 'an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space,' he has embedded USB sticks as file cache devices throughout the city. Bartholl says, 'I am "injecting" USB flash drives into walls, buildings and curbs accessible to anybody in public space. You are invited to go to these places (so far 5 in NYC) to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your files and data.' Current locations (more to come) include: 87 3rd Avenue, Brooklyn, NY (Makerbot), Empire Fulton Ferry Park, Brooklyn, NY (Dumbo), 235 Bowery, NY (New Museum), Union Square, NY (Subway Station 14th St), and West 21st Street, NY (Eyebeam)"

 

If you're walking around bustling New York City, it's probably not with an open laptop. But if you were... you might notice the five USB flash drives that Aram Bartholl installed into walls and columns around the city. The small ports wait for someone to walk by, plug in a laptop, and drop off or pick up some files.

Simple as that.

 

by Don_Caldwell on Monday, Nov 01, 2010

Limewire may be dead, but if you are in NYC you can still share files, and you don’t even need to connect to the Internet.

 

by Matthew Zuras on November 1, 2010 at 11:15 AM

As part of his residency at Eyebeam, Aram Bartholl sealed five USB flash drives into the walls of several New York City buildings, such as the New Museum, Eyebeam and the Union Square subway station, allowing anyone with a laptop to plug in and share whatever they want. "'Dead Drops' is an anonymous, offline, peer-to-peer file-sharing network in public space," writes Bartholl on his site.

We can't imagine that they'll last too long, though, before getting filled up with illicit porn, indie band demo albums and terrible poetry. Check out the full list of the drives' locations at Bartholl's site.

 

By Sean Hollister posted Oct 30th 2010 9:19PM
Back when the walls had ears, spies would store their information in a hidden cache and pass along the location via code. Now, a New York City artist is doing the same with USB flash drives, five of which he's already injected into the city's brick walls. While there some obvious logistical reasons we'd avoid using his creation (not to mention worries about AutoRun in older PCs) we'll definitely keep the idea in mind for Engadget informants who are particularly paranoid about their anonymity. See the first five drives' not-so-secret locations in photos at our source links.

 

By Jeroen Beekmans | Published: Saturday October 30, 2010

Aram Bartholl, also known as the man behind Speed Show, has launched a new project in New York City which is part of his Eyebeam residency. Under the name of ‘Dead Drops’, he created an anomymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space by ‘injecting’ USB flash drives into publicly accessible walls, buildings and curbs.

 

Sometimes it feels like sharing a flash drive around an office is dangerous enough. The question is, do you feel lucky enough to trust one stuck in a public wall?

Article by Scott Stein

 
Syndicate content