github

On Friday, I figured out the doorbell receiver signals and how arduino can tell which doorbell is being rung. Here is the project list which helps me code but also know exactly what goes where. MODE INTERFACE BUTTONS ARDUINO SOUNDS 1. Rest Start Button which goes to Intro Show screenshot of last game Start button Nothing Background loops 2. Intro Intro background Show 2 streaming videos Wait for snapbutton Timer to 3 mins then returns to Rest Exit button Exit button Snapbutton Introduction! 3. Game Game background Timer runs for 30 sec Has 2 pics of players Score If there has been a previous hit the snap shot from the prev hit if game has ended then go to ScoreMail 2 streamed video off screen Exit button Exit button Doorbell signals Hit Me! Game Loop 4. Hit Takes snapshot from whatever stream puts it on the screenshot Who did hit If judge adds points then show total points score from hit return to game Exit button Exit button Judge point input Ding ding ding 5.

 

Format note: Written as a grant proposal.

Forks vs. Knives – Developing the code that governs us

Describe your project

Reaching consensus is never easy and when it gets really tough some reach for their knives. We say, drop the knives and pick up the forks.

 

I just learned how to use Github to share code. I posted the Arduino code for Mary Mack 5000. You can find it here.

The project is still work in progress, and as I add the other sensors the code will be updated. Click on image above for close up of board used with code.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 
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