resident2010

Datamining Hip-Hop’s History

* By Duncan Geere Email Author
* February 20, 2011 |
* 7:41 pm |
* Categories: Crowdsourcing, Media
*

An artist named Tahir Hemphill wants to datamine 30 years of hip-hop lyrics to provide a searchable index of the genre’s lexicon.

 

Posted by Soulskill on Saturday October 30, @05:56PM
from the peer-to-peer-sneakernet dept.
Okian Warrior writes "Aram Bartholl is building a series of USB dead drops in New York City. Billed as 'an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space,' he has embedded USB sticks as file cache devices throughout the city. Bartholl says, 'I am "injecting" USB flash drives into walls, buildings and curbs accessible to anybody in public space. You are invited to go to these places (so far 5 in NYC) to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your files and data.' Current locations (more to come) include: 87 3rd Avenue, Brooklyn, NY (Makerbot), Empire Fulton Ferry Park, Brooklyn, NY (Dumbo), 235 Bowery, NY (New Museum), Union Square, NY (Subway Station 14th St), and West 21st Street, NY (Eyebeam)"

 

If you're walking around bustling New York City, it's probably not with an open laptop. But if you were... you might notice the five USB flash drives that Aram Bartholl installed into walls and columns around the city. The small ports wait for someone to walk by, plug in a laptop, and drop off or pick up some files.

Simple as that.

 

City - by Kenneth Hsu on Monday, November 1, 2010 14:15 - 1 Comment - 178 views

In a year that has given us Facebook Friendship Pages, there’s no end to creatively (and creepily) sharing your personal information through your computer anymore. And with his new project “Dead Drops,” German digital artist Aram Bartholl is making sure no New Yorker can escape the urge to participate. No wi-fi necessary.

... In the meantime, this isn’t only digital art in the city recently — “Dead Drops” is part of a larger “X-Lab” campaign by Eyebeam, the popular non-profit art and technology center in Chelsea, intended to involve the public in creative ways. You can follow other “X-Lab” projects on the Eyebeam tumblr here.

 

Sometimes it feels like sharing a flash drive around an office is dangerous enough. The question is, do you feel lucky enough to trust one stuck in a public wall?

Article by Scott Stein

 

02 Nov 10 13:00 by wconeybeer in category Piracy, USB Sticks

An interesting new offline anonymous form of file-sharing is literally taking to the streets as online services are increasingly targeted by anti-piracy groups and legislation.

Dead Drops is the name that Aram Bartholl has given his radical file-sharing endeavor, a project that is part of his residency at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center.

 

by Don_Caldwell on Monday, Nov 01, 2010

Limewire may be dead, but if you are in NYC you can still share files, and you don’t even need to connect to the Internet.

 

by Matthew Zuras on November 1, 2010 at 11:15 AM

As part of his residency at Eyebeam, Aram Bartholl sealed five USB flash drives into the walls of several New York City buildings, such as the New Museum, Eyebeam and the Union Square subway station, allowing anyone with a laptop to plug in and share whatever they want. "'Dead Drops' is an anonymous, offline, peer-to-peer file-sharing network in public space," writes Bartholl on his site.

We can't imagine that they'll last too long, though, before getting filled up with illicit porn, indie band demo albums and terrible poetry. Check out the full list of the drives' locations at Bartholl's site.

 

By Sean Hollister posted Oct 30th 2010 9:19PM
Back when the walls had ears, spies would store their information in a hidden cache and pass along the location via code. Now, a New York City artist is doing the same with USB flash drives, five of which he's already injected into the city's brick walls. While there some obvious logistical reasons we'd avoid using his creation (not to mention worries about AutoRun in older PCs) we'll definitely keep the idea in mind for Engadget informants who are particularly paranoid about their anonymity. See the first five drives' not-so-secret locations in photos at our source links.

 

By Jeroen Beekmans | Published: Saturday October 30, 2010

Aram Bartholl, also known as the man behind Speed Show, has launched a new project in New York City which is part of his Eyebeam residency. Under the name of ‘Dead Drops’, he created an anomymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space by ‘injecting’ USB flash drives into publicly accessible walls, buildings and curbs.

 
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