popular culture

reposted from BeyondTheChior

A while back Chris Mooney, author of The Republican War on Science, offered some sound advice to climate scientists about “good climate communication”. Basically, if you’re a climate scientist who wants society to take your data seriously, you have to be something of a political scientist too. Mooney spotlights the Evangelical Climate Initiative as an example of good climate communication that can reach a broader constituency. It’s something that’s “not what you’d expect”. The name itself breaks a popular stereotype about who cares about climate — and a stereotype about evangelicals: that they’re inherently anti-science.

 

Ethan Zuckerman has posted a beautiful piece that stitches together many of the ideas we deal with in How To Win and the Center for Artistic Activism. I can’t recommend it enough:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

It ties together polarization, confirmation bias, the media, David Simon and The Wire, and the need for addressing values and narrative before facts.

I’ll post it here for the sake of archiving:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

by Ethan Zuckerman

 

We thought: culture is much more important than politics. Let’s just start getting people living the way they wanna live.

You wanna live in a world where you don’t have to work? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a world where you can get food for free? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a house with lots of women and men and live the way you want? Let’s do it.

Let’s make the world that you imagine real by acting it out.

And if you can act it out, it’s real.

– Peter Coyote on The Diggers

From a PBS documentary on The Diggers.

 

IMAGINE PEACE

by yoko ono

to the pebble people: start your own campaign!

A butterfly is hopping from flower to flower. Oh, good. I think. The butterfly is busybodying as usual.

We are like butterflies. We busybody ourselves every day for our survival as we think we know how. But the difference with us, is that we know we are not as innocent as the butterflies. We are about to ruin this planet we call ours through our stupidity.

Luckily, there are so many of us in the world, who are now awakened, ready to act to save our world.

 
Start Date: 
30 Mar 2006
Hours: 
7:00 pm
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Upgrade! NY
March 2006

Surajit Sarkar discussed his work with the A Deep Fried Jam trio and the community art initiative in India the Catapult Arts Caravan in relation to the media consumption in India.

Surajit Sarkar lives in New Delhi, India. He has held positions as varied as photocopier salesman, bank officer, primary school teacher and developer of curriculum for primary school children and teachers alike. Since 1991, he has worked with video, at first in mainstream television writing and directing a highly successful weekly science & tech program on Indian national TV network. He moved to documentary film making, and has worked on subjects ranging from agriculture, education and the uneven costs of ‘development’. A number of these have been recognized nationally and internationally and have won prizes in film festivals in India and abroad.

 
Start Date: 
22 Feb 2007
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Upgrade! NY

February 22, 2007

A celebrity-centric Upgrade! with artists Jillian Mcdonald and Eyebeam Resident Jamie O’Shea.

Jillian McDonald, famous for “Me and Billy Bob,” presented old and new work which focuses on the subcultures that drive the celebrity and horror film industries. She showed a DVD, some quicktime files, a data-driven web project and more dvd. Jamie O’Shea performed an extraordinarily efficient art experience at precisely 8:22:22 on 2/22. An entire performance, narrated by Corey Sullivan, took place within 1/5 of a second. Jamie’s automated memory process created an indelible, and effortless, impression of this instant.

 
People: Jilian McDonald, Jamie O'Shea
Tags: video, popular culture, performance, event
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