Processing

Start Date: 
4 Feb 2012
Hours: 
12PM-3PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Join Eyebeam Resident Matt Parker for a workshop in Proclipsing. Proclipsing allows you to easily create a Processing project in Eclipse and easily export it to an application or applet.

Eclipse is a more advanced Java editor that allows you to do code completetion, refactoring, debugging, and tracking of changes. It's the most widely used Java editor and makes it much easier to create large applications, rather than simple sketches.

Processing is a free, open source programming language & development environment that was created to teach the fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context with artist-users in mind.

Proclipsing was created by Brian Ballantine, Daniel C. Howe, and Matt Parker.

 
Projects: Lumarca
People: Brian Ballentine, Matthew Parker
Research: Open Culture
Tags: Processing
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Audiovisual technology has returned to spectacle. Artists are armed with new technologies for fusing space and image, sound and sight. What they tend not to have is permanent spaces. And that lack of venues has made audiovisual artists nomadic and provisional, constrained to hastily-provisioned, rectangular, sometimes dim projections. In short, for revolutions to happen, you do need special venues, not just special artists.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Paper, wood, and traditional media aren’t tied to one vendor. They don’t require licenses or agreements. They aren’t, generally speaking, incompatible. If digital art is going to provide artists with the same freedom, it stands to reason that artists working with computation will find ways to make any pixel their medium.

Processing is a good example. It takes some time, but eventually, the understanding dawns upon you: Processing is more a design for how to code, an API, than it is a specific platform. Taken further, heck, it’s more like a way of life – sketch on paper, write simple code, prototype fast, make something happen.

 
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What is it?

Ninja Shadow Warrior will be a stand alone arcade game built with a screen and webcam. The goal is to fill out the shadow of an object as accurately as possible. The scores based on accuracy are kept on a leader board. The game structure of Ninja Shadow Warrior naturally supports face-to-face interaction, as more details can be filled out when more people are playing at once. This game will experiment with crowd sourcing content for the shadow object database.

How do you play it?

Project Created: 
October 2010
 
Start Date: 
1 Apr 2010 - 29 Apr 2010
Hours: 
4:00pm-6:00pm
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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April: Moving Image Design with Eyebeam Fellow Aaron Meyers
Designer and programmer Aaron Meyers will introduce students to Processing, a free open source tool to code interactive moving images.  Students will learn the basics of writing code using a visual approach; focusing on interactivity, drawing, and motion while checking out examples of other artwork created with Processing.  Download April's Drop-in FlierA

 
People: Aaron Meyers
Research: Education
Tags: images, Processing
Aaron Meyers

NYC public school students between the ages of 13–18 are invited to spend their Thursday afternoons, from 3–6PM, at Eyebeam. Each month will feature a series of free hands-on workshops, starting at 4PM, where students will have the opportunity to work with different open-source software programs as used by artists and technologists.

Thursdays in April: Moving Image Design with Eyebeam Fellow, Aaron Meyers. Designer and programmer Aaron Meyers will introduce students to Processing, a free open source tool to code interactive moving images. Students will learn the basics of writing code using a visual approach; focusing on interactivity, drawing, and motion while checking out examples of other artwork created with Processing.

 
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