free culture

Rather than doing unpaid corporate cartography,
join us in mapping the world together as a publicly shared resource.

In April 19th 2011 Google announced its new Google Mapmaker expedition to send its users to map the US. This would seem like a great innovative platform for mapping our streets together for those who don’t know that a service like this have actually existed since 2004. Open Street Map is a great collaborative project which Google chose to compete against rather than collaborate with.

 

As a part of our (Galia Offri & mine) involvement in this year’s Transmediale Festival in Berlin we participated in a panel discussion titled “Lost in The Open”. The focus of the discussion which I moderated was to hash out some of the challenges for Free Culture beyond its epic battles against centralized institutions, record companies, major film studios, copyright regimes…

I am including here the videos for the full panel beginning with introductions by the 5 panelists and continuing with the full discussion and audience Q&A.

“We prepare every year the biggest Free Culture show ever” (Simona Levy)

 
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Cover to the 2nd Edition

"As new technologies come into play, people become less and less convinced of the importance of self expression. Teamwork succeeds private effort."

—Marshall McLuhan

Despite these words, the true nature of collaborative culture as a form of creative expression in the context of digital and network technologies has remained elusive, a buzzword often falling prey to corporate and ideological interests. This book was first created by 6 core collaborators, as an experimental five day Book Sprint in January 2010. Developed under the aegis of transmediale.10, this third publication in the festival's parcours series resulted in the initiation of a new vocabulary on the forms, media and goals of collaborative practice.

Project Created: 
September 2010
 
Projects: Collaborative Futures
People: Adam Hyde, Alan Toner, Astra Taylor, kanarinka, Marta Peirano, Michael Mandiberg, Mike Linksvayer, Mushon Zer-Aviv, Sissu Tarka
Research: Open Culture
Project Type: Activism, Design, Open Source, Web, Writing and Publishing
Tags: book, book sprint, booki, collaboration, creative-commons, flossmanuals, free culture, free software, networks
Partner Organizations:

1703 Right of Copy

This is a reproduction of the original 1703 Right of Copy. Queen Anne granted Oxford the right to publish Clarendon’s History for 14 Years.

Yes. 14 Years. Just think of all the work between 1924 and… 1986 that would be part of the Public Domain

via http://blog.mises.org/12151/the-right-of-copy-a-courtly-privilege

 

Collaborative Futures in Taz.de

The German newspaper Taz.de has covered our Collaborative Futures booksprint. (English translation here) There has apparently been a lot of buzz about the book during Transmediale. I have received a lot of emails about it, mostly from people who think I am still there and want to pick up copies.

 

HOWTO Negotiate a Creative Commons License: Ten StepsMore DIY How To Projects

After a recent conversation with an author that signed a contract and then realized she should have negotiated a Creative Commons license for it, I realized I should revive the HOWTO CC post as an instructable. Same content, new form. New community.

Original all-text-no-pictures version here

 

Transmediale FLOSSmanuals booksprint

I’m on the airplane back from the Transmediale FLOSSmanuals booksprint in Berlin. In five days, six core authors, one programmer, and a handful of additional local and remote contributors collaboratively wrote, edited, and published Collaborative Futures, a book on collaboration. We started Monday morning with only two words: the title of the book. As we raised a toast to our success with the festival director Stephen Kovats at 10PM Friday, we sent the book to the printer. It is due back on Wednesday.

 
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