3D

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Dream House is a generative 3D simulation of a “female” biomorphic architectural structure that dynamically builds up with consumer products over 7 hours. The accumulation of waste occurs in real time and is left up to chance, producingunique randomized animations. Two cameras capture the real time simulation from multiple angles, providing numerous experiences of the same scene. Thepiece is a monument to desire and waste caused by a system that manipulates desire for monetary means.

Project Created: 
October 2013
 
Projects: Dream House
People: Katie Torn
Research: Vision
Project Type: Video
Tags: generativeart, 3D

Here are some nice pics Dan Phiffer took of my work-in-progress installation in the Eyebeam bookstore.

Click to view slideshow.

 

I am very happy to report that I am featured in this week’s science magazine! The magazine isn’t freely available online but I am posting just the little section on me here in case anyone is interested in reading it!

Facing the Genetic Future

Sitting in a therapist’s office, New York City artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg discovered a hair

lodged in a crack in the glass covering a painting on the wall. “I stared at it for an hour,”

she says. “I couldn’t stop wondering who it belonged to, and what I could find out about

that person.”

After reading a story in Science about the new field of forensic DNA phenotyping

 

I am still very much in the middle of my wetlab work for Stranger Visions but the software side – the part that takes DNA information and produces a 3d model of a face – is mostly complete. I thought I would talk a little bit about the software and the concept of inductive bias in this next installment on Stranger Visions. This is a slightly technical post but there is a kind of ethical question  at the end…

 

As many of you probably already know I have been working hard over the past 6 months on a new project Stranger Visions. I am working on the piece as a resident at Eyebeam and in collaboration with the DIY bio lab, Genspace in downtown Brooklyn. I recently gave a LISA talk describing this piece and I thought I would elaborate on some of the details from my presentation through a series of blog posts. In this post I will describe where the idea behind Stranger Visions  came from and how I am producing it in general terms. Future posts will delve into more details about lab work, 3d programming, 3d printing and ethics.

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In Stranger Visions artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material collected in public places. Working with the traces strangers unwittingly leave behind, Dewey-Hagborg calls attention to the impulse toward genetic determinism and the potential for a culture of genetic surveillance.

Project Created: 
May 2012
 
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Lumarca

Lumarca is a truly volumetric display which allows viewers to see three dimensional images and motion. The system requires only a computer, a projector, and common materials found at most hardware stores. This provides an affordable platform for artists to design compelling content that conveys information, narrative, and aesthetic information in a new way. Lumarca is a collaboration between Albert Hwang and Matt Parker.

Project Created: 
September 2011
 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Audiovisual technology has returned to spectacle. Artists are armed with new technologies for fusing space and image, sound and sight. What they tend not to have is permanent spaces. And that lack of venues has made audiovisual artists nomadic and provisional, constrained to hastily-provisioned, rectangular, sometimes dim projections. In short, for revolutions to happen, you do need special venues, not just special artists.

 
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