bikeNYC

Bright Bike STOLEN!

This bicycle was stolen on January 8th 2010 at 195 Bowery NYC, a block south of the New Museum. I attached it to the standard NYC metal scaffolding supports but the thief either unscrewed the bolt, or broke through the metal, and released the scaffolding bracket! It has a white non-reflective "BRIGHT BIKE" sticker on the downtube. The wheels are a brand new set of Open Pros, laced to White Industries ENO hubs (eccentric). Dura Ace brakes, and Sugino cranks. Went in for a gallery opening, came out, and it was gone. This is an ICONIC bike, (there are no other bikes in NYC with the full retroreflective treatment) so if you see anyone riding it, it is stolen.

 

Introducing the new version of the Bright Bike DIY Kit. To BUY a DIY Kit right now, go to BrightThread.com

After a year of testing, we are releasing DIY Kits for an updated version of the Bright Bike. The kits come in two types: Caterpillar and Pinstripes.

The Caterpillar has 1 inch bands that wrap around the main tubes, and in inch dashed lines along the fork and seat stays.

The Pinstripe has 1/4 inch strips that run along the outside faces of all tubes.

Each kit is sized to be large enough for a 61cm frame with extra wide tubing, so in nearly every case, you will have extra materials that will give you room to play and experiment.

Video by Bennett Williamson. Tx to Scott Kildall for playing along. (Michael, Bennett, and Scott are the bike wrappers)

 

Bright Bike V2.0

This is an old post that got stuck in my drafts box… (oops).

Along with Alan Paukman and Jacob Mellinger of Nikolai Rose, we have been making experiments with trying to make retroreflective fabric. Jacob writes:

I did some simple tests yesterday with the yarn dyer. He wanted to open everything up and get an idea of what we’re dealing with.
We mixed together a very small batch of the 3M ink kit and watered it down heavily to bring it closer to a dye.

In the picture below, here is what’s going on:

 
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Bright Bike v2.0 - Pinstripes

After a year of testing we are releasing a new version of the wildly successful Bright Bike.

The new kit is easier to install, adapts better to everyone's desire to style their bike individually, and is now being made availalbe as purchaseable DIY Kits.  Everything is pre cut for quick and easy installation.

There are two styles: Pinstripe and Caterpillar.  The pinstripe covers the key reflective points in long lean streaks of reflection. The Caterpillar turns your main tubes into bands of reflective safety.

Everyone's favorite color is black: it is incognito on an urban black bike during the day, and bright white under headlights at night.  A close second are red and yellow.  We just got in some white, which is slightly pearlescent, and have a light blue, dark blue, green, and orange.

Project Created: 
November 2009
 

My Bike Ticket

This story is too long to tell, but leave it to suffice I got a ticket for some policeman not looking as he walked into the street. My ticket reads “FAIL TO USE DUE CARE.” The irony is that I was on a Transportation Alternatives sponsored ride as part of the Bike New Amsterdam bike slam think tank.

I have contested it, and look forward to my court date 6 months from now on Staten Island. They probably think that scheduling people on Staten Island is a quick way to get them to give in and pay the fine, but it is half a mile from CSI.  My home turf. I look forward to riding my bike over to see the judge and tell him what really happened.

 

Watch the whole thing. Or at least the first 12 minutes. Its worth it. Fascinating. It is so familiar that I feel like I was shown this in grade school… alongside Powers of Ten.

Some things have changed since Ulrich Franzen made it: waterfronts are now viewed as more precious potential parks than he views the street. Putting a two mile long building on any waterfront would not work these days. Also, his vision of shared cars is starting to come true, with shared rentable cars now available in most cities, and bicycle share programs across Europe and heading stateside. I wondered if today’s political and economic culture could handle he importance and respond to the difficulty of such massive change; a review of Boston’s tragically executed and financially draining Big Dig would be a good case study in what can go wrong. All that said, I felt there were two things missing: Subways and Bicycles.

 

In early September I will be participating in New Amsterdam Bike Slam, Transportation Alternative’s co-sponsored bike think-tank as poetry-slam. As the description says:

Over three challenging rounds, each team will defend its proposals in front of a panel of expert judges and a live audience. At the end of the evening, the judges will declare a winner, with the most innovative and practical plan for making New York, and New Yorkers, more bicycle-friendly.

I’m brainstorming already, and I welcome suggestions about how to improve biking in downtown and the NY Harbor area. This is, of course, something near and dear to my heart as I commute by bike to CSI via the SI Ferry.

 
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