interface

I’ve been teaching a class on the subject for 3 years, I’ve been giving talks on the subject for almost a year. Finally I set down and wrote the essay for the second edition of the Collaborative Futures book. On Sunday (Aug 1st 2010) I gave a talk based on this essay at DebConf the Debian community conference. The title of the talk is “Beyond Sharing: Open Source Design”. The (high-pitch audio) presentation is available on the Debian site (requires Firefox or another OGV playing browser).

 

Originally written in April 2007. Minor edits: March 2010.

Preface

In the past 50 years the digital user-interface has become a major field of cultural production, since the innovations of Douglas Engelbart in the sixties (mouse/keyboard/video-screen) through the personal computer revolution in the eighties to the rise of the World Wide Web in the nineties and the wider trends for social web applications since the turn of the century. Producers of hardware and software systems have been attempting to develop interfaces that will direct the users to produce the interaction desired by the system they represent.

 
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Jake Barton is recognized as a leader in the field of interaction design for physical spaces, and in the creation of collaborative storytelling projects where participants generate content. He is founder and principal of Local Projects, an award-winning media design firm for museums and public spaces.

Jake was a finalist for the National Design Award in Communications in 2006 and attended the White House reception hosted by the First Lady and the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. He has lectured extensively at conferences including the Gravity Free Design Conference in Chicago, UX Week in San Francisco, and the IDEA Conference in both Seattle and New York.

His work has received several medals from the IDSA Industrial Designers Society of America, five awards from ID Magazine, and three from the AIGA. He has a master's degree from NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program, where he currently teaches the master's thesis class.

Eyebeam CV
2002F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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World of Awe: mRB (2002)

Yael Kanarek and Bnode (Judith Gieseler and Innes Yates) elaborate on Kanarek's ongoing multi-media project, World of Awe, an original narrative that uses the ancient genre of the traveler's tale to explore the connections between storytelling, travel, memory, and technology. Here, the artists investigate the diffusion of techno-scientific knowledge into popular culture through a fictional supertoy -- the mRB. In the World of Awe's Traveler's Journal, the mRB is a prototype for the moodRingBaby. Resembling an advanced Tamagotchi, the device is capable of holding conversations and telling stories. The project utilizes a 3D web interface that allows the user to browse various aspects of the mRB for clues to its origin, experiences, and character. The mRB web experience is augmented by the physical installation, which incorporates spatial, material and organizational themes.

Project Created: 
October 2002
 
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Atau Tanaka bridges the fields of media art, experimental music, and research. He worked at IRCAM, was Artistic Ambassador for Apple France, and was researcher at Sony Computer Science Laboratory Paris, and was an Artistic Co-Director of STEIM in Amsterdam. Atau creates sensor-based musical instruments for performance, and is known for his work with biosignal interfaces. He seeks to harness collective musical creativity in mobile environments, seeking out the continued place of the artist in democratized digital forms. His work has been presented at Ars Electronica, SFMOMA, Eyebeam, V2, ICC, and ZKM and has been mentor at NESTA.

Eyebeam CV
2003F
SExhibiting Artist
 

Mouse Miles

Dublin based artist Jonah Brucker-Cohen reviewed his work revolving around the theme of “Deconstructing Network” both physical and online.

Jonah Brucker-Cohen discussed some of his projects that attempt to challenge accepted notions of network interaction from networked software hacks and rule-based systems to translating virtual processes and conventions into the physical world.

 
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