parsons

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The Flower sketch with a glance at its code

Zajal is a programming language designed to reduce the friction between creative vision and functioning software. Live coding allows artists to improvise code and experiment freely, turning programming into an act of sculpture rather than architecture. Zajal's simple consistent syntax works hard to get out of the way of creativity, while its Ruby foundations expose coders to an immense world of existing code, discussions, and documentation.

Project Created: 
June 2012
 
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Kate Watkins has an eye for the unique and beautiful. She has a background in painting and graphic design but fled to NY to pursue a MFA in Design + Technology at Parsons The New School for Design. She combines her eye for detail and love of color in her computer software to create lovely sound and performance environments. You will always find her hacking toys or antiques she found at flea markets and turning them into computer friendly machines that act as the tools used to explore musical expression and composition.  At Eyebeam she's working with Carrie Mae Rose on physical computing experiments for the interactive costumes Wearable Weapons.

Eyebeam CV
2011FIntern
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Steve Lambert Visiting Artist Lecture

6:00pm October 27th
Kellen Auditorium
66 5th Avenue #101
New York, NY
All events are free and open to the public.
more info: 212-229-8942

 

A few weeks ago, I stumbled across the site weeknotes.com, and the concept struck to me as a great, low-commitment way of journaling without the pretense of pretending to have some super deep insights  that need to be written down.

Weeknotes are “about reflecting on your work, your achievements, and what’s on deck.“   Simple.

It has been 145 weeks since I started as a fellow at Eyebeam – arguably the beginning of my professional career.  So, what happened on this 145th week?

 

Syllabus: http://prof.crouse.cc/code_for_art

Spring 2010 site: http://prof.crouse.cc/code_for_art/spring_2010

Code for Art is an introduction to C and C++ programming using the Macintosh, UNIX or DOS operating system. Students will learn how to compile basic executable files and be given a strong grounding in applications development. The class will also cover basic IDE and development environment issues as well as platform specific development concerns.

This class isn’t called Programming 101 because rather than linked lists and assembly language, we are interested in image, audio, and video manipulation. Rather than utility, we are interested in experience. This is how your work will be evaluated.

The class has 3 parts.

 
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