drawing

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Joanna Spitzner is an artist whose recent work seeks to make direct connections between everyday experiences and larger social issues. It often takes the form of experimental organizations as artworks, including The Art School in the Art School, The Joanna Spitzner Foundation, Inc., The Union of Undercover Artists, CoAct, and the Urban Art Rangers. The forms her work takes are temporal; employing performances, exchanges, discussions, video, audio, and documentation. She has been has involved in several collaborative projects with artists in the UK, including Exit Review in Liverpool, UK; Exit Cork in Ireland; Press Corps at Static Gallery in Liverpool, UK; Prime: Part-Time; and Hen Weekend. She works with the Red House Arts Center in Syracuse as director of programming for Red House Art Radio, and internet radio station that produces and presents experimental audio, interviews, and independent music.

Eyebeam CV
2008FExhibiting Artist
S
 
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Marisa Olson is an artist and media theorist whose interdisciplinary work addresses  the cultural history of technology and the politics of participation in pop culture. She's exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Whitney, Centre Pompidou, Tate(s) Modern + Liverpool, the Nam June Paik Art Center, the British Film Institute, Sundance, PERFORMA, and PS122 and been reviewed in Artforum, Art21, Liberation, Folha de Sao Paolo, the Village Voice, the Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. As originator of the term 'Postinternet Art,' she has contributed to several notable anthologies and has forthcoming books in English & Spanish devoted to the subject. She has also written for Wired, Flash Art, Art Review, Afterimage, and Art on Paper and curated exhibitions and programs at the Guggenheim; SFMOMA; White Columns; Artists Space; Zero1; SF Camerawork, where she was Associate Director; and Rhizome, where she was Editor & Curator.

Eyebeam CV
2014F
SResident
2013F
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(see all rows)
2012F
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2011F
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2010F
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2009FExhibiting Artist
S
 
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Lee Walton is an Experientialist whose projects and performances are full of humor, detailed planning, and interaction with the outside world.  Serendipitous combinations of rule and chance, Walton’s projects are always playful, precisely calibrated, conceptually on-target and deeply attentive to the everyday patterns and rhythms of contemporary city life. After a two-year affiliation with the Headlands Center for the Arts in Marin, Walton has received many accolades, from the Video Selections at the 8th Havana Biennale, to multiple residencies and fellowships as well as an induction into the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

Eyebeam CV
2009F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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Darren Kraft uses powdered graphite to photorealistically reproduce icons and logos associated with consumer and political culture.

Eyebeam CV
2009FExhibiting Artist
S
 
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Ten Thousand Cents is a digital artwork that creates a representation of a $100 bill. Using a custom drawing tool, thousands of individuals working in isolation from one another painted a tiny part of the bill without knowledge of the overall task. Workers were paid one cent each via Amazon's Mechanical Turk distributed labor tool. The total labor cost to create the bill, the artwork being created, and the reproductions available for purchase (to charity) are all $100. The work is presented as a video piece with all 10,000 parts being drawn simultaneously. The project explores the circumstances we live in, a new and uncharted combination of digital labor markets, "crowdsourcing," "virtual economies," and digital reproduction.

 

Project Created: 
May 2008
 
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SADbot (The Seasonally Affected Drawing Robot) is a solar powered, interactive drawing machine for the Eyebeam window gallery in New York City. It uses two 18.5'' x 13'' solar panels to power two stepper motors which allow the control of a pen in two dimensions.

SADbot also takes input from people walking outside, by using a set of sensors which can tell how much light they're getting (photocells) and putting them up against the inside of the window, SADbot knows if someone is covering up one of the sensors, and can change its drawing behavior accordingly.

The window gallery doesn't get any direct sunlight, so we set up an array of mirrors on the roof of Eyebeam to direct sunlight to a fixed mirror hanging off the roof to reflect light down to the solar cells in the gallery window. The solars cells, in turn, power the motors to run the drawing machine.

Project Created: 
May 2010
 
Start Date: 
16 Oct 2002 - 1 Dec 2002
Hours: 
Wednesday - Sunday, 12 - 6 pm
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Beta Launch: Artists in Residence '02

540 W. 21st St.

Beta Launch: Artists in Residence '02 is the inaugural exhibition of Eyebeam's Artists in Residence Program, a multidisciplinary initiative that supports the development, creation, and presentation of art works using new technologies and digital tools. The exhibition was on view from October 16 through December 1, 2002, at Eyebeam's Chelsea facility.

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Security Patterns - Studio Visit Install

I just put up an installation of work at Eyebeam for Studio Visits. This is work I have been producing over the last 6 months. The work is primarily old found books cut with the laser cutter, as well as some laser cut drawings.

FDIC Insured - Studio Visit Install

 

Black Market Type and Print Shop


July 9 - August 14, 2009
Opening July 9, 6-8pm

This installation is guest curated by Joseph del Pesco. He has created font alphabets based on the handwriting of famous contemporary artists, which are available for use by visitors.

Image is from Black Market Type and Print Shop Installation

 

“Black Market Type and Print Shop”
06.09.09

Author: Micah Malone

05.07.09-06.27.09 Feldman Gallery at the Pacific Northwest College of Art

Creating fonts can be a touchy subject, raising issues of intellectual property—touchier still when the fonts in question sample hand-drawn lettering from well-known works of art. However, for the exhibition “Black Market Type and Print Shop,” font generation becomes a clever game of connoisseurship. Curator Joseph del Pesco appropriated mostly handwritten texts from single pieces of art (or series of works) as source material for his exhibited typefaces, without seeking permission from the sampled artists.

 
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