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This one is nice-obvious,  from New York Mag (thanks Mitch Said!)

The Message Is the Message  Photo-illustration by James Porto

"The Message Is the Message" Photo-illustration by James Porto

“The Friend Feeder II” a.k.a.  Invaders of Britain.
After Rembrandt’s Woman with Snake.
Sketch for an animation.

The Friend Feeder II

The Friend Feeder II

Speaking at Dorkbot PDX, August 9th

Marisa Olson and I are speaking at Dorkbot PDX this Sunday, August 7th, 7PM. The annoucement says:

We are extremely honored to have two distinguished artists from New York visiting Portland and sharing their work with DorkbotPDX. Please help us welcome these amazing and inspiring dorks from across the way!

I’m flattered to be called distinguished… !

I’m very grateful to Amber Case for patching us into the PDX scene, and Thomas Lockney and Jason Plumb for setting up this opportunity to share with some PDX dorks.

Sunday, August 7th, 7pm
Location: About Us, 107 SE Washington
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=107+SE+Washington+portland
http://dorkbotpdx.org/dorkbotpdx_0×04

Library - 7802

While installing a temporary station near Death Valley this summer, we met with Dr. David Dubois, air quality expert at the Desert Research Institute in Las Vegas.

Listen to Dr. Dubois discuss some of the important air issues in the great basin:

New drawings of poor little pox-ridden red squirrels:
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red

search.InternetArchive

I received a special request for an Internet Archive pipe. Starting from the advanced search page there was plenty to work with. The Advanced XML Search form returns whichever record fields you might want as XML, JSON, CSV, or an HTML table. The form exposes all of passed parameters in the search response URL, making it straightforward to rig a pipe to create a well formatted query.

Internet Archive Search Pipe

Internet Archive Search Pipe

Some convenient details in the pipe. Adding long strings in the Pipes interface is annoying due to the short textbox lengths so having each of the record fields added to an array, fl[], makes it easy to see all the parameters. And the Pipes team have added a Create RSS module which makes converting the returned fields to an RSS feed much cleaner.

One quibble with the data format from the Internet Archive; the record fields are returned in XML as repeated elements which makes it just a little harder to manipulate. The JSON response is great with every field placed in a distinct element.

I tried tuning the quality of results. By default the search string John Singer Sargent gets translated into this baroque query:

(title:john^100 OR description:john^15 OR collection:john^10 OR language:john^10 OR text:john^1) (title:singer^100 OR description:singer^15 OR collection:singer^10 OR language:singer^10 OR text:singer^1) (title:sargent^100 OR description:sargent^15 OR collection:sargent^10 OR language:sargent^10 OR text:sargent^1)

The ^s are boosting operators in Lucene with the numbers setting the relevancy weights. Exact phrase matching did not work as well since the artist name could be formatted differently. Compare John Singer Sargent to “John Singer Sargent”.  Lucene’s proximity search operator could do the trick though it can cast the net too wide.

I’ve added the pipe to the Met object information aggregator.

Internet Archive results for John Singer Sargent

Internet Archive results for John Singer Sargent

//TODO: Format the results to include the media type icon that the Internet Archive provides – book, audio, video.

Posted in Metropolitan Museum of Art Tagged: books, search

The Pop Up Party on the LowLine (DDC09’s alternative to the Highline) was fantastic.

Over the course of one week, we researched and explored the Highline – asking ourselves questions about what it once was, what it is now, who built it, for who – by interviewing people on it, and people who live and work nearby, including those who have never checked it out, and never plan to. We considered everything we had learned, and using all our skills and resources developed of the course of this summer, we decided to design a guerrilla, public intervention.

Our intervention took the form of an instant art happening, what we called a “pop up party.” Our party was designed to include the elements of the Highline we found successful – green space, social, seating, pretty, etc – as well as elements we thought were lacking – public performance space, free refreshments, spaces for ANYONE to make things, play and party! We wanted the people we interviewed – including those who love the Highline and those who felt it represents an unwelcoming gentrified neighborhood – to want to come to our party. We designed a space we hope anyone would feel welcome, and most importantly, a space where people could participate in it’s creation!

We used (mostly) found materials - A huge yellow tarp rescued from the street, gorgeous handpainted paper patterns, plastic planters, native plants dug up from around the neighborhood, and tons of foam, plastic, and cardboard. Beyond that, we kept it cheap and easy - We wanted our guests to see that creating an environment like our Lowline doesn't require any special resources or tons of cash! Mostly it took us time (only 4 days!) and a whole lot of creativity!

We kept it mobile so that we could be in and out in a couple of hours, but also so people could feel comfortable rearranging it and recreating it as needed. Someone added a dance floor, and many people used our sidewalk chalk to create a colorful environment to play in. Seats were moved around, impromptu hula hoop lessons were taught, people took the stage to serenade the rest of us. Our Mobile Movie House featuring videos we made over the course of the summer……well, it was MOBILE!!

This was a first version – We experimented with posting a lemonade stand via pulley system on the Highline – to connect high and low, to attract attention, to feed the masses! We were swiftly kicked off, but we still claim success. Video documentation soon to come. Our floating banner was BEAUTIFUL! It was hard to control, and our fragile balloons left our sign sinking over the course of the night. We liked this. It could have been better. Our fort became a lovely backdrop for our Plant It! roving plant workshop. In the future, we have to solve the design problem of creating a fort for a site we can’t access in the present.

The PUP Mobile Movie House in action

The PUP Mobile Movie House in action

Plant It! mobile plant workshop and hanging garden.

Plant It! mobile plant workshop and (hanging) native plants garden.

Plant It! mobile plant workshop detail

Plant It! mobile plant workshop detail

LowLine / HighLine !!

LowLine / HighLine !!

Pop Up Party floating banner in action!

Pop Up Party floating banner in action!

Testing the Pop Up Party banner

Testing the Pop Up Party banner

A party on wheels...getting ready to depart the Eyebeam

A party on wheels...parade getting ready to depart the Eyebeam

Live performances on the LowLine

Live performances on the LowLine

DDC09 Artists Extaordinaire, Christina Kral and Adriana Young, kickin back in the Jacuzzi!

DDC09 Artists Extaordinaire, Christina Kral and Adriana Young, kickin' back in the Jacuzzi!

A wild game of 4-Square!

A wild game of 4-Square!

The cost of one cup of lemonade = ONE SECRET!

The cost of one cup of lemonade = ONE SECRET!

“How can web technologists interested in the interface between digital footprint and environmental footprint, and artists concerned with collaborative observation, mapping and intervention in the environment, bring a fresh approach to ‘citizen science’ and public engagement in the environment? Cheryl Northey found out at the recent Futuresonic Urban Festival of Art, Music & Ideas.” dw-world.de
audio interview

by Jade, Luis, Caroline, and Fernando

(opening 60 seconds lovingly appropriated from another student film!!)

video response piece by Spencer, Zoe, Luther, Siena, and Lily