reBlog

Current Reblogger: Chloë Bass

Chloë Bass is an artist, curator and community organizer based in Brooklyn. She is the co-lead organizer for Arts in Bushwick (artsinbushwick.org), which produces the ever-sprawling Bushwick Open Studios, BETA Spaces, and performance festival SITE Fest, which she founded. Recent artistic work has been seen at SCOPE Art Fair, CultureFix, the Bushwick Starr Theater, Figment, and The Last Supper Art Festival, as well as in and around the public spaces of New York City. She has guest lectured at Parsons, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College. Other moments have found her co-cheffing Umami: People + Food, a 90 person private supper club; growing plants with Boswyck Farms (boswyckfarms.org); and curating with architecture gallery SUPERFRONT (superfront.org). Chloë holds a BA in Theater Studies from Yale University, and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College.

http://chloebass.wordpress.com


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Sissu says: The research conducted over the last few days, weeks, minutes, continues to address formats of agency, modular systems, self-organised or semi-fictional institutions, and what artist Lois Weinberger described as ‘botanical diaspora’ — formed by an accumulation of nomadic plants or “hardy migrants, able to flourish in poor soil,” dislocated organisms “subverting any human projection of territorial sovereignty or fixed borders” (Tom Trevor 2007). There is a text to write on Common Flowers – Flowers Common (BCL), a book on animation to finish, bike rides to undertake, meetings of the FREE DEPARTMENT to organise, tactics of concealment (e.g. for writing) to develop.

An imaginary URL is created by replacing a link with words or images only.
DIY URL.
Do
it
yourself.

 
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Sissu Tarka says: S L E E P L E S S 7 8 H O U R S u r b a n d i a g r a m m a t i c
http://www.dnp.co.jp/museum/nmp/madeintokyo_e/mit.html (Made in Tokyo by Atelier Bow-Wow), http://designmuseum.org/design/cedric-price (Cedric Price), http://www.museumashub.org/artists/pedro-reyes?project=14 (Pedro Reyes, Velotaxi 2007, Sombrero Colectivo 2004), http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/8/view/6712/michael-ubbesen-jakobsen-baubike.html (Michael Ubbesen Jakobsen's baubike).

 
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Sissu Tarka says: Settling down in Japan for a little while. Sound landscapes. Non-sound. Bulb dress. Histories. Circuits.
Akihiro Kubota with The Cellular Automaton Band, sound > 28th January 2007 at ZAIM side A (10:32)! http://cellautoband.net/, The Way Sensing Go http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLMNos0cNl0&feature=channel, Atsuko Tanaka’s infamous Electric Dress http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE_H6xgwqWw&feature=related, Zen For Film http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8z1sOsIrshU&feature=related

 
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Sissu Tarka says: Met Toshimaru Nakamura http://vimeo.com/8822156, http://www.samadhisound.com/toshimarunakamura/ on a humid day in Tokyo last year. Working on our recorded interview right now, the sound conversation around issues of the no-input mixing board triggers other ‘noise’: Steina and Woody Vasulka’s “Noisefields” 1974, or the light installation “Electric Chair or TV” 2009 by Masaki Fujihata with whom I shared thoughts on subverting devices, reconstructing experience and the search for irrational objects.
Legacies of Tony Conrad’s “The Flicker” 1965–1966?
Or one might say – This is More Brilliant than the Sun... (Kodwo Eshun).

 
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Thanks, Christopher Robbins, for an excellent job reblogging the last two weeks, it's been a pleasure! Come see Christopher's project at Eyebeam's exhibition Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus, opening next week!

Now we're turning the reblog over to Sissu Tarka. Sissu is a postdoctoral researcher whose current interest lies in the criticality of emerging practices and economies of media art. She works as part of CRUMB, Eyebeam's UK-based curatorial research partner-the online resource for curators of media arts. Sissu will be in Residence at Eyebeam June 20 - 27, and will will participate with Mushon Zer-Aviv, Michael Mandiberg, and others on the Collaborative Futures book sprint as part of Re:Group June 23 - 25.

ReBlogged by: 
Roddy Schrock
 
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PROVIDING TOOLS

Allright, let's get back on "theme" (which was, if you recall, Participatory Art) Now we're focusing on works that provide tools to encourage specific kinds of actions by the participants themselves.

SO:

I've already mentioned Parfyme's Yellow Ladders:

 

And you've probably seen Ji Lee's speech bubbles around town:

 

Then there is TxtMob with Tad Hirsch and with the Institute for Applied Autonomy, which gives protestors a central message center through mobile phones:

 

Art Farm (of exploding TV infamy) made a whole series of instruction booklets to instigate new use of spaces, this one about mobile inflatables. They bring it down to the nitty gritty, including how budget a generator you can go before frying your equipment:

Recently Raumlabor's space-buster revisited ant farm's booklet to bring inflatable spaces to the undersides of the bridges of NYC.

 

Reclaim the Streets (who I reblogged here) is another group that spurs action through instruction booklets and example:

 

Alfrdo Jaar's use of tools is more indirect. Here, he attached a switch in a homeless shelter to a vivid red light installed in the cupola of a landmark monument in Montreal. Whenever a homeless person decided to hit that switch, the city would see.

 

Nils Norman (of the fantastic exploding school) designs parks built for easy squatting, with foliage placed specifically to aid in hiding and escape from authorities. They exist as diorama's, and I hope he steps up to get some of these actually built. Might have to go through a shell architecture firm so his motives aren't so obvious...

 

Finally, Guillermo Gomez Pena / Pocha Nostra take Augusta Boal's Theater of The Oppressed to strange, queasy places, seeing the stage as practice for life, scripting scenes that may start with construction but end in naked craziness.

"If we learn to cross borders on stage, we may learn how to do so in larger social spheres."

 

So, what's going on in all of these works? Tactics range from active coaching, providing specific steps or guidelines, to simply providing a canvas or pointing towards a suggested action. All of these pieces imply further action to come. In fact, quite often the role of the artist (or activist, or programmer, or troublemaker) ends when the interaction begins, once the pieces are laid out and directions staked.

 
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Mark Skwarek says:

"I'm working on a piece with Joseph Hocking and Edgar Ramirez called 'the leak in your home town'. What we are doing is AR on the iPhone using the BP flower as a tracking marker and adding the broken pipe with gushing oil rising out of ita> like a chimney pipe. We are also doing AR with GPS as well.

description:

Create your own oil spill in your local neighborhood with 'the leak in your hometown' app currently for the iPhone 3GS and coming to the android. Take your mobile device to your local BP gas station and launch the app. Use the app to look at the BP logo and see the broken pipe and clouds of oil emerge from the sign. "

Christopher Robbins says: This is pointing towards a really exciting possibility for Augmented Reality apps on phones. Along the lines of the two oil spill mapping projects I blogged last week, or the graffiti I've begun to see spring up around Endicott, NY ("IBM Chemical Spill Here"), I'd love to see apps that overlay actual but hidden environmental or criminal abuses on the sites where they take place.

Think Natalie Jereminjenko's Feral Robotic Dogs, repurposed to sniff out pollution, but in your pocket and a free download.

 
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Mark Skwarek says:

"I'm working on a piece called 'the leak in your home town'. What we are doing is AR on the iPhone using the BP flower as a tracking marker and adding the broken pipe with gushing oil rising out of ita> like a chimney pipe. We are also doing AR with GPS as well.

description:

Create your own oil spill in your local neighborhood with 'the leak in your hometown' app currently for the iPhone 3GS and coming to the android. Take your mobile device to your local BP gas station and launch the app. Use the app to look at the BP logo and see the broken pipe and clouds of oil emerge from the sign. "

Christopher Robbins says: This is pointing towards a really exciting possibility for Augmented Reality apps on phones. Along the lines of the two oil spill mapping projects I blogged last week, or the graffiti I've begun to see spring up around Endicott, NY ("IBM Chemical Spill Here"), I'd love to see apps that overlay actual but hidden environmental or criminal abuses on the sites where they take place.

Think Natalie Jereminjenko's Feral Robotic Dogs, repurposed to sniff out pollution, but in your pocket and a free download.

 
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Douglas Paulson sez:

What's the deal with all those empty lots in East Flatbush? Join us Tuesday, June 1, at Anthology Film Archives for the world premiere of the documentary "The Good, The Bad, & The Empty."

CUP Teaching Artist Douglas Paulson and students from the BCCP's afterschool program at Walt Whitman Middle School looked deep into the emptiness and investigated hidden uses, ownership patterns, and alternate futures for the lots right near their school. They interviewed a community development consultant, an affordable housing advocate, a real estate expert, and asked property owners some tough questions to uncover the surprisingly full lives of empty lots.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with empty lot experts moderated by the documentary crew. This event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to info@anothercupdevelopment.org so there won't be any empty spots.

The Good, The Bad, & The Empty


Tuesday, June 1 at 7:30 pm


Anthology Film Archives


32 Second Avenue (at 2nd Street)


New York, NY


F/V to 2nd Ave

 
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OPEN HOUSE AT WASSAIC PROJECT JUNE 12

Visit artist studios, participate in free workshops, and see my project the Work Projects Administration 2010, in which we are bringing back the WPA, because the government hasn't.

Plus a bonfire, barbecue, and swimming holes. Escape the city for a lovely rural weekend. It's a 2 hour train ride on the Metro North Harlem Line.

http://www.wassaicproject.com/

1:00: FREE Art Class for Kids

With guest Artist Sena Clara Creston

Meet outside of the Luther Barn, 17 Furnace Bank Rd.

4:00 - 7:00: Open Studios + reception

Walk through the newly renovated Luther Barn studios

Talk to residents and see how they do what they do.

Luther Barn Auction Ring, 17 Furnace Bank Rd.

>------------------------------------------------

THE WASSAIC PROJECT is located at:

35 Furnace Bank Road

Wassaic, NY 12592

Directions By Rail:

The Wassaic Project is easily accessible on the Metro North Harlem line. The site is within walking distance of the Wassaic, NY train station.

Directions by Car:

http://bit.ly/WassaicMap

 
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