Sri Lanka Shipping Container Retreat

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Building in shipping containers (as well as building out shipping containers) is nothing new. This retreat house interests me because through its construction, it has become no longer shippable. Rather than integrating a permanently shippable aspect into the design, the materials have been made usable for aesthetics in a way that limits functionality.

In contrast, the Singapore Takeout (http://intransit.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/singapore-sends-its-chefs-on-the-road/) maintains shipping functionality while also producing a high-end product. While the kitchen itself is perhaps not as aesthetically pleasing as some fancy restaurant kitchens, the food that it turns out appears to be just as drool-worthy.

If we're creating projects out of reclaimed materials, how much should we take the original life and functionality of those materials into account when planning a reinterpreted product?

Sri Lanka Shipping Container Retreat

by Christina Nellemann on June 27th, 2011. 32 Comments

A friend and fellow tiny house lover recently sent me this link from Container Home on this shipping container cabin retreat in Sri Lanka. The house was constructed with local reclaimed material in about a month by architect Damith Premathilake. The tiny house is located on an Army base and was built for a lieutenant colonel.

The 700 square foot retreat is constructed of two shipping containers, timber strips from old bunkers and weapons boxes and used railway sleepers. It is designed to embrace the views and climate of the surrounding environment, and create a place of relaxation and beauty while using already available resources.