Data Visualizations: 5 Beautiful Social Media Videos

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

visualizationData visualizations are a wonderful way to display the interactions between large groups of people within a network. Virtual places like Twitter (Twitter reviews), Facebook (Facebook reviews), or Flickr (Flickr reviews) can be easier understood when you see a visual representation of their inner workings. We’ve chosen five fresh videos that visualize various social media ecosystems.

1. SweetNTweet

If all Twitter searches were this fun, I’d probably do little else than stare at them all day. This experimental Twitter search engine is made with Processing; it lets you choose keywords for a Twitter search, and results are displayed in the form of petals which turn into tweets when they reach the destination. I haven’t been able to find the actual application, but you can see a demo in the video below.


2. World’s Eyes

This project displays a visualization of digital photos publically shared on the web by people visiting Spain. In the video you can see which regions of Spain are photographed the most, and which are more or less tourist-free. The other video focuses on partying in Barcelona in the summer of 2007.


3. Bicycle Built for 2,000

Amazon’s Mechanical Turk is a service that harnesses the power of an on-demand human workforce. It’s been used in a very interesting way by Aaron Koblin and Daniel Massey, who’ve employed the voices of around 2000 people to create a version of the song Daisy Bell (yes, that’s the song sung by HAL 9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey). You can see the entire project in action here, or a narrated video introduction of the visualization below.


4. Edinburgh Twestival Social Visualization

One of the sponsoring companies of the Edinburgh Twestival, which happened on February 12th, used Twitter to track the networking and socializing at the event. What you see in the video is people sending messages to a special Twitter account with details on their conversations with other participants. This data was then retrieved through Twitter’s API and displayed live at the event. The result is a cool visualization that shows how many connections between people happen at one such social gathering.


5. Visualizing Last.fm

This fascinating visualization video uses data from music social network Last.fm to display the popularity of music genres in certain parts of Europe. On the project’s site you’ll find other interesting visualizations, such as the geographical distribution of fans of bands such as Tokio Hotel or Bjork and how various factors (concerts, for example) affect the fan base.

The video is available here.

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