Library dashboard

http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/wikified/WatsonStatsTemp/WatsonStatsTemp

Dashboards are all the rage. I’ve been able to get some museum library information to power new charts and start working out what kinds of questions we might be able to answer. What works are best represented in the libraries? What kinds of connections are there between special exhibitions and library research traffic? …

Watson Library Dashboard (detail)

Watson Library Dashboard (detail)

Watson Offsite Storage - World Map

Watson Offsite Storage - World Map

I’m using Many Eyes as a prototyping environment, but will be replicating some of the work in the Google Visualization API. It has a few more chart types and seems to be a bit more stable. All of the data is being stored in Google Spreadsheets.

Watson Library LC Number Tree Map

Watson Library LC Number Tree Map

http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/wikified/WatsonStatsTemp/OffsiteLCCallNumData:TreeMap

The treemaps are really coming out great – the one above breaks down our offsite storage by LoC call number. The Library of Congress classification scheme gets to a fairly low level of granularity, and though it doesn’t quite match up with departments it still gives a good (partial) view of our collection development policies.

//TODO: The Google visualization API seems straightforward – make a motion chart of all of the related time series. Pulling public access catalog information out of Innovative seems to be a real pain. I’d really like to match library search queries against sitewide searches. Although I’m avoiding dusting off any Time Series Analysis textbooks – but this one wasn’t that scary.

Sorry for the long pause between posts.

Posted in Metropolitan Museum of Art, Visualization Tagged: charts, manyeyes, maps