Feed items

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

5viking64060_feb566fed2.jpg

A few days ago i was in Bergen in Norway. Where everything is so postcard pretty...

5ville769_f5a7f7ce98.jpg

5cerf19_d201eb2efe.jpg

that fast food joints are afraid to stand out from their surrounding.

5mcdo65002_551b67f214.jpg

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

The first edition of Botacon took place last weekend in Brooklyn. The lineup of speakers was impressive and made for one of the best conferences I’ve ever attended. But one materials-related presentation stood out. Mr.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

After many hours sorting thru C macros in the Pd code, working with all sorts of people contributing bits of code and experience here and there, Peter Brinkmann finally was the closer on the Pd/Android port and in the process created a nice, embeddable libpd. Here’s an alphabetical credits list of anyone who helped along the way:

Chris McCormick, Dominik Hierner, Hans-Christoph Steiner, Martin Roth, Miller Puckette, Naim Falandino, Peter Brinkmann, Peter Kirn, Scott Fitzgerald, and others

And the announcement:

 
Tags: thinking
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Paper, wood, and traditional media aren’t tied to one vendor. They don’t require licenses or agreements. They aren’t, generally speaking, incompatible. If digital art is going to provide artists with the same freedom, it stands to reason that artists working with computation will find ways to make any pixel their medium.

Processing is a good example. It takes some time, but eventually, the understanding dawns upon you: Processing is more a design for how to code, an API, than it is a specific platform. Taken further, heck, it’s more like a way of life – sketch on paper, write simple code, prototype fast, make something happen.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam



The human brain contains many regions that are specialized for processing specific decisions and sensory inputs. Many of these are shared with our fellow mammals (and, in some cases, all vertebrates), suggesting that they are evolutionarily ancient specializations. But innovations like writing have only been around for a few thousand years, a time span that's too short relative to human generations to allow for this sort of large evolutionary change. In the absence of specialized capabilities, how has it become possible for such large portions of the population to become literate?

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

"The growing number of digital billboards on U.S. roads and highways consume large amounts of energy and are creating a wide variety of electronic waste, according to a new report (pdf). The new study says the typical digital billboard consumes about 30 times as much energy as the average American household."

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam



Speaking at the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) Congress in Berlin on Tuesday, a pair of researchers demonstrated a start-to-finish means of eavesdropping on encrypted GSM cellphone calls and text messages, using only four sub-$15 telephones as network “sniffers,” a laptop computer, and a variety of open source software.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

In my last post I told a story about the Level 3/Comcast dispute that portrays Comcast in a favorable light. Now here's another story that casts Comcast as the villain.

Story 2: Comcast Abuses Its Market Power

As Steve explained, Level 3 is an "Internet Backbone Provider." Level 3 has traditionally been considered a tier 1 provider, which means that it exchanges traffic with other tier 1 providers without money changing hands, and bills everyone else for connectivity. Comcast, as a non-tier 1 provider, has traditionally paid Level 3 to carry its traffic to places Comcast's own network doesn't reach directly.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Like Steve and a lot of other people in the tech policy world, I've been trying to understand the dispute between Level 3 and Comcast. The combination of technical complexity and commercial secrecy has made the controversy almost impenetrable for anyone outside of the companies themselves. And of course, those who are at the center of the action have a strong incentive to mislead the public in ways that makes their own side look better.

So building on Steve's excellent post, I'd like to tell two very different stories about the Level 3/Comcast dispute. One puts Level 3 in a favorable light and the other slants things more in Comcast's favor.

Story 1: Level 3 Abuses Its Customer Relationships