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The Bogotá Car Free Day has been a massive inspiration to people around the world, taking cars off the street and freeing up the city.

Currently Bogotá holds the world's largest car-free weekday event covering the entire city. The first car-free day was held in February 2000 and became institutionalised through a public referendum

 
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I have a university post at ImaginationLancaster, and the lab is a lead partner in all FutureEverything projects, including New Mobilities.

ImaginationLancaster is an open and exploratory research lab at Lancaster University that engages in multi-disciplinary, innovative projects related to people, places, products and systems.

 
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The Centre for Mobilties Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University is developing with us the New Mobilities theme for FutureEverything 2011. CeMoRe studies and researches the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of 'mobilities': the large-scale movements of people, objects, capital, and information across the world.

 
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Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


plan b are artists Sophia New and Daniel Belasco Rogers. They often work with GPS, and created you, me and everywhere we go by tracking everywhere they traveled for a year and displaying the results.

you, me and everywhere we go (2008)

As part of Recoded, an exhibition at Peacock Visual Arts and conference at the Centre for Modern Thought, we showed some results of a whole year of tracking ourselves with GPSs. This was in the form of two large prints of Berlin showing the subtle differences and an animation made for us by Andreas Schlegel showing how our paths overlapped and differed during the year

 
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In our impact trial of OurTravel at FutureEverything 2011, we want to look at how people who take regular journeys together can create ‘social travel communities’. This has similarities to the Familiar Stranger project by Eric Paulos and Elizabeth Goodman, which was interested in how we can connect with mobile media with individuals that we regularly observe but do not interact with, on public transport or in other public places.

 
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Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Of course probably the best known transport data visualisation is Flight Patterns by Aaron Koblin.

The paths of air traffic over North America visualized in color and form.

 
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Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Christopher Osbourne spoke at FutureEverything last May and showed some of the incredible transport data visualisations he has been doing at ITO.

 
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Toby Barnes at Mudlark has developed Chromaroma, an online multiplayer game played out as you travel the London Underground.

Chromaroma is a game that shows you your movements and location as you swipe your Oyster Card in and out of the Tube.

It connects communities of people who cross paths and routes on a regular basis, and encourages people to make new journeys and use public transport in a different way by exploring new areas and potentially using different modes of public transport.

 
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Christopher Osbourne is doing some fantastic data vis on transport, here has some thoughts to share on OSM.

At the rapidly approaching State of the Map 2010, I will be hosting a potentially controversial panel on the subject “What’s wrong with OpenStreetMap?”

A slightly risque look at the areas we think OSM is getting it wrong, and getting it right too of course. SotM is a big celebration of all things OSM, but there is a need to highlight issues that the community, the OSMF, and local chapters, should address.