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Someday, all art will be on the Internet. Maybe or maybe not. But what is emerging online today is increasingly polished and sometimes, as with this work, which visualizes a movement from Bach’s first cello suite in geometric form, wildly popular. Alexander Chen’s video went viral this year, and it deserves the acclaim.

 

Beatriz da Costa's anti-cancer work in progress, called "The Life Garden," is currently on display at Eyebeam in Manhattan.

 

Imagine Bach's first Cello Suite as a series of white dots circling and plucking white lines. Now watch it.

Using the math behind string length and pitch, the visualization represents each note as a string to help people understand better "music's underlying structure and subtle shifts," according to creator Alexander Chen.

The visualization is the first piece produced by Baroque.me, created by Google employee Chen as a part of his residency at Eyebeam

 
Projects: Data Visualization
Tags: Alex Chen, Huffington Post, Press, media, Data Visualization

The Society for Environmental Graphic Design brought together technology, design and interaction experts, as well as 200 attendees passionate about design, to discuss how location-based technologies are transforming our experience of physical spaces and to explore what lies ahead.

 

"Money is one of the most intimate things there is. I might give you the contents of my wallet, but I won't give you access to my bank account."

Meet Fran Ilich, a media artist and activist who started his own investment bank six years ago with nothing more than server space. On the eve of Bank Transfer Day, he sits with me in the dimly lit kitchen of Eyebeam Art and Technology Center where he is a fellow, to discuss the Spacebank and how he ended up at Occupy Wall Street.
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"Money is one of the most intimate things there is. I might give you the contents of my wallet, but I won't give you access to my bank account."

Meet Fran Ilich, a media artist and activist who started his own investment bank six years ago with nothing more than server space. On the eve of Bank Transfer Day, he sits with me in the dimly lit kitchen of Eyebeam Art and Technology Center where he is a fellow, to discuss the Spacebank and how he ended up at Occupy Wall Street.

 

Until the end of this year we’ll be having weekly features on each of our Makers Muse Award Recipients. You’ll read their original writing, see some of their work and glean greater insights into what makes these seven individuals so unique in their fields.

To open our weekly features we have Geraldine Juárez, whose work is focused on the internet and in the street through a wide range of media. Her aim is to understand the spaces that emerge when information, property and power collide, with special interest in low, open and pirate technologies. (You can read her full bio here).

 

What struck me when I spoke with Ayah about her company littleBits is
people like Ayah are makers. To me makers are people who are making
products that will ...