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Past Teen Programs

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This is a series of conversations between Eyebeam residents and fellows exploring how art and new tools can interrogate one another but also converge in creative exploration. 

The first in this series features James Bridle and Ingrid Burrington, discussing "The Black Chamber". As technology advances and becomes increasingly networked and integrated with our daily lives, it tends towards a greater invisibility, a seamlessness and an unreadability. From the Cipher Bureau to Room 641A, from the datacenter to the iPhone, from the drone command module to the shipping container, the black boxes of the network litter the contemporary landscape. Unable to see inside them, we construct fantasies about their use, develop new ways of thinking about them, and attempt to probe them through techniques legal, technical, and magical. Eyebeam Residents Ingrid Burrington and James Bridle will explore the aesthetic and imaginative space of the black box, and outline some of their own practices for approaching them.

Other Talks in this Series:

Tuesday, May 27: Eyebeam Alumni Chris Woebken + Heather Dewey-Hagborg

Tuesday, June 3: Eyebeam Alumna Laurel Ptak + McKenzie Wark

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This is a monthly game testing event for independent game developers and enthusiasts run by former Eyebeam fellow Kaho Abe and Come Out & Play. The focus will be on play-testing, open dialogue and discussion around games in development.

This monthly meeting is a great opportunity for game developers to get valuable feedback for projects in progress. For game enthusiasts, these events are a place to learn more about the game development process, techniques and systems behind games. The goal of these monthly meetings is not only to encourage and nurture the development of high quality games through testing and discussion, but also to create opportunities for game testers, players and enthusiasts to become more engaged and active in the game development community.

This is a monthly game testing event for independent game developers and enthusiasts run by former Eyebeam fellow Kaho Abe and Come Out & Play. The focus will be on play-testing, open dialogue and discussion around games in development.

This monthly meeting is a great opportunity for game developers to get valuable feedback for projects in progress. For game enthusiasts, these events are a place to learn more about the game development process, techniques and systems behind games. The goal of these monthly meetings is not only to encourage and nurture the development of high quality games through testing and discussion, but also to create opportunities for game testers, players and enthusiasts to become more engaged and active in the game development community.

The facilities and surroundings of Eyebeam make it an ideal place to test a variety of games -- from analog to digital, from street to computer games, from board games to art games, and more. Some things that maybe available during the event, depending on ongoing gallery events, include: projector, speakers, mixer, computer stations (Mac) with Internet, Wi-Fi, large indoor space, sidewalk space, various public parks in the area including the High Line and public areas by the pier (see map).

Events are scheduled every third Saturday, 2:00PM-5:00PM.

* Please note that this upcoming Playtest on 3/15 is running from 2:00PM-3:30PM

To attend the next event, please RSVP here.
Persons interested in submitting a game to test must indicate requirements to test, goals of testing, as well as number of people required to test on this form.

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Venezuelan born American sound artist and programmer Wolfgang Gil explores the interrelationship of sound, the listener, and the space of listening. Gil’s sounds are temporally discrete, physical events; and yet are linked in layered logics to produce unified, tangible, sonic constructions. He creates sound that goes beyond the speaker; filling, narrowing, dividing, coloring, saturating, and emptying the space of listening.

Gil’s work is experiential. Thus, it is in the listener’s willingness to engage in a personal dialog with the sound and space that the work finds its purpose. In Gil's work, sound becomes the contexts in which the listener is encouraged to contemplate time, space, and the act of listening itself.

In 2012 Gil, Daniel Neumann, and Richard Garet launched a portable gallery/platform under Garet’s record label Contour Editions. With a focus on multichannel sound installations, the platform addresses the needs of sound works that require a specialized listening situation in order to be fully experienced. For Contour Editions – Installation, the situation of listening is considered to be an integral part to the works themselves. The completed work is not the audio file, as it would be on CD or .MP3 releases, but the total conditions within the space where the work is presented. Gil performs different roles in the organization, including curatorial and production responsibilities. Contour Editions – Installation has released 7 such installation works with Gil’s close involvement.

 

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THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.  THANK YOU.

We share our regular world with billions of bacteria and fungi, but are for the most part unaware of how they shape our world -- unless we get sick.  What if you could make a wearable biosensor that showed you in real-time how your own body's ecosystem works in concert with the environment?

Join The Cotard Syndicate for this workshop, where you will learn about their research and make a 3D-printed biosensor that you can wear, track, and read the data collected from your micro- and macro-ecosystems.

ABOUT THE PROJECT & INSTRUCTORS
M(y)Crobes is a project by The Cotard Syndicate, comprised of neuroscientist Siddharth Ramakrishnan and media artists and Eyebeam alumni Stefani Bardin and Toby Heys. The project explores our cohabitation with microbes that live within, on and around us. The Cotard Syndicate has developed a wearable biosensor for the neck, comprised of a disk of agar that is laid into a 3D printed bezel of recyclable ABS plastic that is exposed to the elements.  Seeds will be implanted into the agar medium to track the microbial growth through the sprouting of these small plants. Thus, the wearer will see, in real time, the effects of their own biotic micro-ecosystem in concert with the macro-ecosystem of the environment.

The project aims to bring these organisms to the forefront by culturing them, allowing us to see how they directly impact a living being like a small plant, while also showcasing the variety of microbial cultures that we may encounter/host everyday.  These cultured microbes will actively affect the growth of seedlings placed in the agar-wearable, thereby allowing us to observe how these ubiquitous life forms actively affect life and growth by altering environments.

PREREQUISITES & REQUIREMENTS
None!

This workshop is in conjunction with Eyebeam's Computational Fashion initiative. Computational Fashion is supported in part by The Rockefeller Foundation Cultural Innovation Fund.

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This is a monthly game testing event for independent game developers and enthusiasts run by former Eyebeam fellow Kaho Abe and Come Out & Play. The focus will be on play-testing, open dialogue and discussion around games in development.

This monthly meeting is a great opportunity for game developers to get valuable feedback for projects in progress. For game enthusiasts, these events are a place to learn more about the game development process, techniques and systems behind games. The goal of these monthly meetings is not only to encourage and nurture the development of high quality games through testing and discussion, but also to create opportunities for game testers, players and enthusiasts to become more engaged and active in the game development community.

This is a monthly game testing event for independent game developers and enthusiasts run by former Eyebeam fellow Kaho Abe and Come Out & Play. The focus will be on play-testing, open dialogue and discussion around games in development.

This monthly meeting is a great opportunity for game developers to get valuable feedback for projects in progress. For game enthusiasts, these events are a place to learn more about the game development process, techniques and systems behind games. The goal of these monthly meetings is not only to encourage and nurture the development of high quality games through testing and discussion, but also to create opportunities for game testers, players and enthusiasts to become more engaged and active in the game development community.

The facilities and surroundings of Eyebeam make it an ideal place to test a variety of games -- from analog to digital, from street to computer games, from board games to art games, and more. Some things that maybe available during the event, depending on ongoing gallery events, include: projector, speakers, mixer, computer stations (Mac) with Internet, Wi-Fi, large indoor space, sidewalk space, various public parks in the area including the High Line and public areas by the pier (see map).

Events are scheduled every third Saturday, 2:00PM-5:00PM.
To attend the next event, please RSVP here.
Persons interested in submitting a game to test must indicate requirements to test, goals of testing, as well as number of people required to test on this form.

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All titles in the Bookstore will be on sale until Eyebeam’s move at the end of June. We have a wide selection of books, magazines, and catalogues centered on art, culture, technology, new media, and more.

New titles up to 25% off. Older titles 75% - 90% off. 

*Free book and trading card set with every purchase. Free tote bag with purchases over $100

 

*until supplies last

 

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Arielle Mella is a junior who attends Hunter College High School. She is an aspiring game designer and computer scientist. Her interests include art, writing, gender studies, and anything related to technology. In the future, she hopes to work on more projects including game development by making social awareness games that are commentary on prevalent issues around the world. Currently, she is studying gender roles in video games and would like to pursue projects relevant to that topic. She is currently a Student Resident and Peer Mentor at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in Chelsea.

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Designers and users of assistive technology have been invited to share their experiences with technology as prosthetic.  What do we, able bodied, disabled, and everyone along that spectrum, use to get through the day?  From robotic legs to bits of wire, designers and end users are hacking their worlds to make them more accessible.

Tickets: $10 (includes beer/wine reception)

Discount code: NYSCIstories for $2 off tickets

Purchase tickets here

 

Human Plus Stories

A two-part event of true personal stories presented by The Story Collider and the New York Hall of Science, with support from the National Science Foundation.

Humans have always used technology to extend their abilities.  Wheels, bows and arrows, steam engines, cars, and telephones have changed history by enhancing what an unadorned person can do.  This technology is extending the abilities of all people, shading the distinction between the disabled and the able bodied.  Amputees competing in the mainstream Olympics are just the most visible manifestation of this change.  As new technologies emerge, the blind will see, the deaf will hear, and soldiers ravaged by war will regain their participation in daily life.  And for all of us, the shortsighted, the distracted, the forgetful, and those of us who don’t get to the gym very often, new technologies will continue to augment our abilities and extend our lives.

In some cases, this is an unalloyed good, but there are ethical questions of who gets access to this technology and how it will affect the patterns of life, death, and society shaped over millennia.  The Story Collider and the New York Hall of Science have brought together diverse stories that embed this millennial change in personal narratives. These will be presented in three events.

Full schedule of events at: http://nysci.org/event/human-plus-stories/2014-04-02/

 

New York Hall of Science

New York Hall of Science presents 450 exhibits, demonstrations, workshops and participatory activities that explain science, technology, engineering, and math. A visit to NYSCI is a hands-on, energetic educational experience where you can indulge your curiosity and nurture your creativity. NYSCI offers professional development for teachers, produces curricula and resources for classrooms, and studies how technology, gaming and play affect how we learn. NYSCI was founded at the 1964–65 World’s Fair and has evolved into New York’s center for interactive science, serving a half million students, teachers, and families each year.

 

The Story Collider

Science surrounds us. Even when we don't notice it, science touches almost every part of our lives. At the Story Collider, we believe that everyone has a story about science—a story about how science made a difference, affected them, or changed them on a personal and emotional level. We find those stories and share them in live shows and on our podcast. Sometimes, it's even funny.