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Brendan Byrne is an electronics artist, curator, and instrument designer from Brooklyn. Brendan has curated electronic and experimental performances in New York City for the past six years. In this time, he curated the world's largest circuit-bending festival, Bent Fest, and co-founded the in/out Computer Music festival. In 2012 Brendan founded Xiwi Electronics, a small design and fabrication studio dedicated to crafting beautiful devices for navigating electronic environments. He is a current contributing artist to the real-time media performance group Fast Food Collective and a recent graduate of the Parsons MFA Design and Technology Program.

Brendan joins Eyebeam working in collaboration with Bryan Ma.

 

 

August 2015
“How to Make Design”
Fab11 Symposium
Boston, MA

July 2015
Presentation of the Brick Shortie
MIT Media Lab Design Summit
Boston, MA

April 2015
Bloomberg Businessweek Design 2015
San Francisco, CA

February 2015
Keynote at International Design Association IxDA
San Francisco, CA

November 2014
“Democratizing the Internet of Things”
Web Summit, Machine Stage
Dublin, Ireland

November 2014
A Call For a Coup d’État
PopTech 2015
Camden, Maine

September 2014
“The Internet As Material”
EmTech
Boston, MA

September 2014
Democratizing the Internet of Things
World Maker Faire
New York, NY

September 2014
“Hardware: From Hobby to Revolution” with Mike Senese
MakerCon
New York, NY

September 2014
“Democratizing Hardware”
Keynote at Women ETC
Richmond, VA

May 2014
“The Internet As Material”
Keynote at O’Reilly SOLID
San Francisco, CA

May 2014
littleBits introduces the Arduino module – Ayah Bdeir
Bay Area Maker Faire
San Mateo, CA

February 2014
Making in New York
Keynote at CE Week
New York, NY

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FREE AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR TEENS

SIGN-UP HERE!

Ever wonder who the best rapper ever is? Who used the phrase 'On Fleek' first? Who 
rap's favorite basketball player is? Which sneaker is more hip-hop: Adidas or Nike?

The Rap Research Lab is a studio for teens to explore art, data visualization, graphic 
design and the stats behind Beats, Rhymes & Life in a creative environment.

WHEN:
Tuesdays & Thursdays
4-6PM
October 6, 2015 - January 20, 2016
Showcase Event: January 23, 2016
12-Week Program

WHERE:
Eyebeam @ Industry City, Sunset Park
34 35th Street
5th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11232

Transportation:
Subway - D/N/R 36th Street
Bus - B35 bus to 39th Street and 2nd Avenue

Free snacks and MetroCards

No previous art or technology experience needed!

SIGN-UP HERE!

Recent Free Workshops:
August 19, Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls
August 22, McCarren Play Center

Questions? Email erica@eyebeam.org

This program is made possible in part by the generous funding from

and the support of our partners

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keepalive-survival-guides-5.

 

Keepalive

Aram Bartholl 2015
permanent outdoor installation
material:  rock, steel, router, usb-key, thermoelectric generator, fire, software, PDF database
size: 100 x 110 x 90 cm

at Landart Kunstverein Springhornhof Neuenkirchen, Niedersachsen, Germany
commissioned by Center for Digital Cultures, Leuphana University Lüneburg
curated by Andreas Broeckmann, Leuphana Arts Program

inauguration: Sunday, August 30, 2015, 11:00 am at Springhornhof

The boulder from the region Neuenkirchen, Niedersachsen contains a thermoelectric generator which converts heat directly  into electricity. Visitors are invited to make a fire next to the boulder to power up the wifi router in the stone which then reveals a large collection of PDF survival guides.  The piratebox.cc inspired router which is NOT connected to the Internet offers the users to download the guides and upload any content they like to the stone database .  As long as the fire produces enough heat the router will stay switched on. The title Keepalive refers to a technical network condition where two network endpoints send each other ‘empty’ keepalive messages to maintain the connection. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keepalive   To visit the piece please arrange an appointment with Springhornhof.de.

The project “Keepalive” by Aram Bartholl was realised in the context of the research project “Art and Civic Media”, as part of the Innovation Incubator Lüneburg, a large EU project funded by the European Fund for Regional Development and the Germna State of Lower Saxony.

 

Press
http://hyperallergic.com/231483/fire-up-a-wifi-router-hidden-inside-a-rock/

Official Invitation (german)
http://springhornhof.de/aram-bartholl-keepalive/

Pictures
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bartholl/sets/72157655953293283

keepalive-flickrset

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You are warmly invited to the Keepalive opening on Sunday, 30th of August 2015

11.00 a.m. Meeting point at Kunstverein Springhornhof
Leave for Hartböhn by car (approx. 10 min) or by bicycle (approx. 20 min, rental bikes are available)

11.30 a.m.
Greeting: Prof. Dr. Martin Warnke (Chair of Art Association)
In discussion: Andreas Broeckmann (Leuphana Arts Program) & Aram Bartholl

Afterwards
Food, drinks and data sharing at the campfire

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“Keepalive” by Aram Bartholl (*1972 in Bremen) looks just like a normal rock from the outside. There is no sign that the stone, which lies inconspicuously in Lüneburger Heide on the edge of idyllic Hartböhn, contains hundreds of digital books. An internal thermoelectric generator and WiFi router must be activated by a lighting a fire under the rock before an electronic survival guide library can be accessed. Data and text can also be added by smartphone or laptop.

Media artist Aram Bartholl works with paths of knowledge and information communication that work against the developments of the digital age and question our handling of data. In this and other projects, he undermines power structures and control mechanisms in the use of internet services and data transmission, mostly through the introduction of a random, uncontrollable element.

In “Keepalive” the stone itself becomes the data medium. In a very archaic, but at the same time clandestine manner, information can be exchanged only locally — in contrast to networked servers, services and clouds worldwide, this rock is not connected to the internet. You have to get close to nature in the countryside, find the stone and make a fire to activate the data source. Anyone can do it once they have found out the exact location of the stone from either the nearby Kunstverein Springhornhof or another source.

Following the advice in the survival guides prepares you — this is the promise at least — for solo survival in the chaotic world of computer programming as much as for solo survival in the wilderness. “Keepalive” examines what “survival” really means and sounds out our true needs. The work resists the centralising forces of the Internet, raises questions about the democracy of knowledge management and ignites an autonomy backlash.” (Jennifer Bork)

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The “Keepalive” project by Aram Bartholl was created in conjunction with the research project “Art and Civic Media” as part of Innovations-Inkubators Lüneburg, a major EU project supported by the European Regional Development Fund and the State of Lower Saxony.

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Extended until 31 October!

Since 1997, New York-based Eyebeam has actively provided support for and exposure of projects that critically engage with emerging technology and crack it open in unexpected ways. For this exhibition, Eyebeam's Director Roddy Schrock has asked some of Eyebeam’s most forward-looking and adventurous artists working in myriad tech-related forms, from conceptual to sound arts, to render their work into objects. The resultant pieces challenge, quiz, and interrogate notions of materiality and its porous relationship to data and concepts. Featuring work by Chloë Bass, Zach Blas, James Bridle, Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Zach Gage, Brian House and Addie Wagenknecht.

Presented with Upfor Gallery in Portland, OR.