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In this discussion we will review the dynamics and patterns of online abuse on social networks. How does a minor scuffle so quickly become an avalanche of online harassment? Why are women, people of color, and the queer and trans community disproportionately targeted? What are steps we can take to build safe spaces on the internet? A killfile or block button is no longer a sufficient tool to prevent abuse and the common advice “don’t feed the troll” ignores the contemporary climate of online abuse. We will discuss tactics to minimize online abuse and the potential for structural change.

Panelists: Erin Kissane, Sydette Harry and Melissa Gira Grant 

Space is limited so please RSVP here.

Doors: 7:00PM

Panel begins: 7:30PM

Archived here: https://soundcloud.com/eyebeamnyc/new-topics-in-social-computing-online-abuser-dynamics

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In light of tectonic shifts in the overlap between art, culture and technology in recent years, Eyebeam is throwing open its Residency program to a single invocation - Techne! 

Techne, for the Greeks, was inclusive of the arts as well as craftsmanship and engineering. Now, the chasm between art and technology is narrowing, with boundaries between arts, craft, and aesthetics blending in exciting new ways, largely due to high-tech/low-cost computation. For seventeen years, Eyebeam has been at the forefront of bringing these worlds together and with this residency Eyebeam again looks to support practitioners who agree that the most interesting and visionary work need not be hemmed in by genre or medium but can flourish through technological savvy. 

We are asking you — artists, digital creators, engineers, creative technologists, researchers and cultural producers — to join us in creating provocative work that helps realign the arts to the mechanic. Eyebeam will grant up to $5,000 to each selected residency project, either to a single individual or a collaboration of two or more artists.

FULL CALL HERE

APPLICATION DEADLINE: November 21, 2014 at 12PM (noon). Applicants will be informed of their application status by February 3, 2015.  

In light of tectonic shifts in the overlap between art, culture and technology in recent years, Eyebeam is throwing open its Residency program to a single invocation - Techne! 

Techne, for the Greeks, was inclusive of the arts as well as craftsmanship and engineering. Now, the chasm between art and technology is narrowing, with boundaries between arts, craft, and aesthetics blending in exciting new ways, largely due to high-tech/low-cost computation. For seventeen years, Eyebeam has been at the forefront of bringing these worlds together and with this residency Eyebeam again looks to support practitioners who agree that the most interesting and visionary work need not be hemmed in by genre or medium but can flourish through technological savvy. 

We are asking you — artists, digital creators, engineers, creative technologists, researchers and cultural producers — to join us in creating provocative work that helps realign the arts to the mechanic. As devices become further extensions of the body, in a time when advertisements are tailored to hyper-specific, localized desires and privacy is nearly a luxury product, artistic practice is more important than ever in influencing the cultural trajectory. This residency cycle Eyebeam is looking to support new work that is deeply examining artistic creation in relation to emergent technology in various forms, and will consider all proposals, especially those that are provocative and have positive real-world impact. 

Eyebeam will grant up to $5,000 to each selected residency project, either to a single individual or a collaboration of two or more artists. The incoming number of residents will be determined by the quality of applications and available funding. 

Residents will be selected to join continuing residents and fellows for an upcoming 5-month cycle, ideally beginning in mid-March, 2015 but potentially later. If a different start date is preferable, please indicate that on your application inside the "additional information" section. 

EYEBEAM VALUES: Eyebeam’s core values include a critical questioning of the status quo and a belief in risk-taking as an essential element to achieve progress. This has been demonstrated through seventeen years of experimentation via creative use and misuse of technology. This approach has resulted in the development of creative platforms, tools and exciting works of art. 

SUPPORT: The 5-month residency is a period of concentrated work on a visionary, experimental project. It is a chance to use the time, space, community, and tools at Eyebeam to reach the next stage of one’s practice.

Eyebeam will work closely with the artists and technologists to see their projects realized, including acting as a facilitator to coordinate organizational partnerships.

NOTE: International applicants are welcome to apply, although Eyebeam unfortunately does not have the resources to provide travel or accommodation. Eyebeam is happy to work with selected applicants, where required, to help them to secure funds to cover these expenses. International Residents are responsible for securing their own visas for the residency period. Eyebeam is happy to provide necessary paperwork to help expedite the process.

RESIDENCY BEGINS: MARCH 2015 AND RUNS THROUGH JULY 2015 (5 MONTHS

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Applications are only accepted via the online application system (link). Applications received after the deadline of 12:00 (EST) PM (noon), November 21, 2014 EST will not be accepted. All applications and work samples must be submitted through the online form. No exceptions will be made. You can create a user/password during the application process and log back into the server to update your application before the final deadline.

All Residents will be selected from this open call, based on the quality of the work being proposed, the applicability of Eyebeam's tools and resources in realizing and supporting the work, and the proposed project’s relation to the overarching research themes and activities of the organization. Collaborative applications are accepted. 

Complete applications must include the following information:

 • Contact Information (Collaborative teams must clearly state how technical and creative responsibilities will be met in the team).

 • Resume or CV (.rtf, .pdf, .doc) -- combined into a single document if applying as a collaborative.

 • Work samples in the form of URLs. Include a project description with your work sample that explains your contribution to the piece, how it is meant to be viewed and how it relates to your proposed project(s)/research.

 • Concise responses to all application questions. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 • Single PDF document containing any visuals (including timeline with milestones, and additional information such as data flow, sketches, schematics) that will help reviewers understand the proposal.

For further info., please read our Residency FAQ

APPLY HERE

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Eyebeam is a nonprofit exhibition space, artist colony, and R&D lab that supports dynamic and risk-taking work at the intersection of art and technology. For seventeen years, Eyebeam has been dedicated to exposing audiences to experimental and interdisciplinary work, providing an environment for dialogue, collaboration, and discovery.

 

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Planning, creating and managing digital archives, catalogs, and collections is a growing concern as organizations seek to manage files and records, metadata-gather, and enable complex searches of their cultural production, ephemera, archives and/or born-digital assets.

This two-part workshop teaches popular open-source digital archiving and collections management packages. Learn to select, install and perform basic configuration on Omeka, used primarily in academic and digital humanities projects; and CollectiveAccess, used primarily in GLAM [Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums] projects.

The first half of the workshop will teach you what to expect and consider in a planning a cataloging software project; orient you to use cases and a general review of how digital cataloging softwares are implemented, and includes an overview of features, metadata schemas, and problems to look out for.

The second half dives deeper into a hands-on comparison of two specific programs, and participants will have an opportunity to build [and break!] from either their own servers or a temporary web interface and command-line access Openflows provides. We want to help you build what’s most useful to you! FYI we can’t provide server support in the workshop.

Register Here!

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Hadassah Damien is a technologist, catalog software developer, and digital communications specialist at Openflows. As a community organizer who also implements technology to help activists succeed, and a multimedia artist who also builds digital archives, her work intersects functionality with agility, practicality, and the democratic politics of open-source cultures. She has collaborated on digital collection sites for John Jay library, The Interference Archive, and more. She holds an MA in American Studies, and a Certificate in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy from the CUNY Graduate Center.

Openflows Community Technology Lab is a NYC-based worker cooperative committed to bringing collaborative and cutting edge open source software [FLOSS] solutions to non-profit organizations, NGOs, libraries, progressive community organizations, and more. Since 2003 we have specialized in planning, configuration, and customization of FLOSS for large and small organizations worldwide.

SCHEDULE

Part A -- 6:30-8:00: Theory, digital catalog/archive project overview

Break -- 8:00-8:30

Part B -- 8:30-10:30: Hands-on learning, technical interfacing, back-end

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

The first half of the workshop is geared to participants of all technical backgrounds.

The second half is geared to those comfortable with some web-building. If you are okay using WordPress, you'll be okay at this section.

Please bring a computer or be comfortable using a station at Eyebeam, as we will be learning by making.

If you bring your own machine, ensure you have:
-- a command-line tool if you plan to try a CLI install OR an FTP client [try Cyberduck if you don’t have one] if you don’t want to use the command line
-- an HTML editor [try TextWrangler if you don't have one],
-- and a few images to load into the systems to test it out.

You may also proceed in the class by loading the software onto your own server. In this case, you’ll need to come with the following additional preparations:
-- your login and password to the server
-- two databases created, and the usernames and passwords for those

REFERENCE URLs

Software List: http://www.femmetech.org/2014/10/digital-archiving-software-1/

CollectiveAccess: http://www.collectiveaccess.org/about/roadmap

Omeka: http://omeka.org/

Register Here!

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The Queer  Art and Technologies (QUAT) research group is a collective of artists,  curators, writers, and academics who are interested in exploring the intersection of art and technology while questioning technology's heteronormativity and gender bias through monthly discussions, talks, lectures, and public exhibitions.
http://ghostridethebody.tumblr.com/
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Arjun Srivatsa is Eyebeam's first ever Best Boy!!!! Some of his previous projects include Net Artist Daily, the American Medium Sound Series and the Solo Jazz Cup meme. He currently lives under blankets. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

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This discussion will consider topics related to what MIT professor Rosalind Picard calls “affective computing,” emotion recognition in artificial intelligence and the use of technology to simulate empathy or respond to mood. Sensors in automobiles might respond to a stressed out driver with softer light or upbeat music. Commercial surveillance applications increasingly measure facial movements to profile the reactions of customers. Meanwhile data is collected on social networks for engineering relationships. A team of social media researchers recently proposed an “early breakup warning system” for Twitter that is possible with just public availably data. Affective computing is automating the largely undervalued and often gendered work known as “emotional labor.” A nanny, waitress, community manager, journalist, administrator assistant, or counselor is subject to the fallacious conflation of “doing what she loves” and labor, and therefore often underpaid for her services. Attempts to automate care work could reveal the complexity and difficulty of professions that demand social intelligence, expressive emotion, and creativity. 

Panelists: Sarah Jaffe, Lauren McCarthy and Sabrina Majeed

Doors: 7:00PM

Panel begins: 7:30PM

Archived here: https://soundcloud.com/eyebeamnyc/emotional-labor-and-affective-computing

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http://fffff.at/paint-figure-drawing-class

Join F.A.T. Lab for the PAINT figure drawing class during Open House New York (OHNY).  We will draw live models on computers with mouse in classic paint!  No antialiasing! No layers! Limited undos! Come and show off your mouse drawing skills in good old desktop drawing style. Bring your own laptop and very important bring a MOUSE!! No touch allowed!! Make sure you have
paintxp or paintbrush installed on your book.

Requirements & Rules:

- bring a laptop (limited desktop computers available onsite)
- bring a mouse
- install paint (classic paint for win7, OSX, linux)
- no layers
- 3 undos
- 48 colors max
- no gradients
- no antialiasing
- mouse only, no touch!
- save as BMP!!

Put away you tablet and show off some true mouse skills at the 'PAINT figure drawing class'!

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RSVP

Members of the Queer Art and Technology Research Group based at Eyebeam, Miki Foster, Erica Kermani, and CultureHub’s S.O. O’Brien, invite artists and enthusiasts to participate in an open lab centered on Arduino and physical computing. Focusing on an in-process design for an upcoming interactive installation, QUAT members explore the use of micro-controllers in combination with large surface transducers and bone conductors. If you are working on your own Arduino or physical computing projects and want the opportunity to work in a more collaborative session or just want to get feedback on your project, come join us in the studio for these open work and skill sharing sessions.


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RSVP

Members of the Queer Art and Technology Research Group based at Eyebeam, Miki Foster, Erica Kermani, and CultureHub’s S.O. O’Brien, invite artists and enthusiasts to participate in an open lab centered on Arduino and physical computing. Focusing on an in-process design for an upcoming interactive installation, QUAT members explore the use of micro-controllers in combination with large surface transducers and bone conductors. If you are working on your own Arduino or physical computing projects and want the opportunity to work in a more collaborative session or just want to get feedback on your project, come join us in the studio for these open work and skill sharing sessions.