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Eyebeam is pleased to announce that resident Joanne McNeil and collaborator Dan Phiffer are winners of the Digital Media and Learning Competition’s Trust Challenge. The Trust Challenge seeks solutions to issues of trust, privacy, and safety in connected learning today. McNeil and Phiffer’s proposal “OurNet: Building Trusted Network Infrastructures for Youth” was chosen from a competitive pool of contestants.

OurNet: Building Trusted Network Infrastructures for Youth” is a series of workshops for students teaching them how to build a simplified social network that would be unique to their classroom and also a private internal network without using an internet service provider (ISP). This project will empower students with a basic understanding of the key components of network infrastructure, while at the same time enabling them to develop their own private networks.

Documentation for this proposal was based on existing projects: Phiffer's "Occupy.here" and Paul Ford's "Tilde Club". 

 

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Edged Into a Void: Sensoria is inspired by the seminal text Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl in which Harriet Jacobs, writing pseudonymously as Linda Brent, describes living in her grandmother’s garret before escaping to New York. For seven years Jacobs hid in the negative space of a pent roof to escape her slaver. She designated the nine feet long, seven feet wide and three feet high empty architectural site a place to transition into freedom. The garret was small and admitted very little light impacting Jacobs’ physiological state. This sculpture is a spatial inference represented by three objects. It is a set of geometric shapes tracing, deconstructing, and inverting what we know of the garret. 

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Exertions is a series of written choreographies that, when performed and documented, extend the terrain of late nineteenth century movement studies into more ambiguous, strenuous, emotional, and contemporary ground.

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For whom and for what actions are built environments designed? Untitled Attitudes is an open-source library created for the Google SketchUp Warehouse proposing to integrate real people doing real things into the design process. Referring to both senses of the word, this diverse series of bodies in attitude is a visible spectrum often unrepresented in spatial design. These figures challenge the values and beliefs—the attitudes—that predominate the field.


Over the next 6 months, young architects will be invited to design an environment specifically for members of this library.

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The Remembrancer, a newspaper named for the City of London's representative to the UK government, documents 46 corporations listed on the London Stock Exchange, which are known to the database of A Quiet Disposition, and are, by association, implicated by the data it has gathered.
The Remembrancer was commissioned by the Open Data Institute and the Victoria & Albert Museum.

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A Quiet Disposition is an online intelligence-gathering system which trawls the web for information about unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or 'drones'), and analyses what it finds to produce new connections. The full database is available at aquietdisposition.com, and as of December 2014 it contained some 28k people, 35k documents, and 83k semantic terms connected with drone programmes. 
A Quiet Disposition was created in part during a residency at Eyebeam in collaboration with The White Building in London.

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This field guide to network infrastructure in New York City shows you how to identify the cables, cameras, sensors, and networks of fiber and power that increasingly shape the urban environment. 

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Resonant Hyper-Symbol Modulator Scapes is the virtual world that parallels MSHR's recent installation series Resonant Hyper-Symbol Modulator. The audio in this piece reflects the generative light-audio feedback systems used in RHSM and in MSHR's recent live performance series Resonant Entity Modulator.

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The Natural History Museum is a new museum that offers exhibitions, expeditions, educational workshops and public programming. Unlike traditional museums, it makes a point to include and highlight the social and political forces that shape nature. The Natural History Museum affirms the truth of science. It inquires into what we see, how we see, and what remains excluded from our seeing.