Wearing Technology: cultural and psychological impacts of tech on the body

October 27, 2014 At The New School, Theresa Lang Center, 55 West 13th Street
Hours: 7:00PM-9:00PM
Cost: $7 online / $10 at the door | Free for New School students, faculty & staff

Eyebeam and The New School present a panel discussion that explores the cultural and psychological implications of wearing technology. The event will feature leading researchers in clinical psychology, contemporary art history, and fashion technology who will offer insights into the history of wearables and how the body is represented and experienced in fashion design and performance.

Susan Ryan (Louisiana State University), will discuss her recent book, Garments of Paradise (MIT Press), a comprehensive survey of wearable technology that lends a critical eye toward both the design and social context of our devices, from the Walkman to Google Glass. Miriam SteeleHannah Knafo (The New School) and Sabine Seymour (Parsons) will present their current research project, BodyMetaphor, which bridges design, art, and social science to examine fashion and wearable tech’s influence on self-perceptions and physiological assessments of the body. Wendy D’Andrea and Steven Freed (The New School) will examine the intersection between body awareness and physiological states, and the mediating influence of emotion.

Wearing Technology is organized as part of Eyebeam’s Computational Fashion initiative, which brings together artists, fashion designers, scientists, and technologists to explore emerging ideas and develop new work at the intersection of fashion and technology. Eyebeam is a nonprofit art center that supports and promotes dynamic and risk-taking work at the intersection of art and technology. Computational Fashion is supported in part by The Rockefeller Foundation Cultural Innovation Fund.

About the Presenters

Susan Elizabeth Ryan, Ph.D., Professor of Art History at Louisiana State University and Affiliate of the LSU Center for Computational Technology (CCT). She teaches contemporary and new media art history and has helped found an interdisciplinary Art/Engineering undergraduate minor at LSU entitled AVATAR. She has lectured internationally on dress and creative technology, and has published several books in the fields of art and design history including the recent publication from MIT Press, Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age

Miriam Steele, Ph.D. is a professor of psychology and the Director of Clinical Training at The New School for Social Research, Clinical Psychology department. Dr. Steele is the co-director of the Center for Attachment Research  with Dr. Howard Steele. Research concentrations included the bonds between parents and children and the intergenerational consequences on attachment, adoption and foster care, and the intergenerational transmission of body image.

Dr. Sabine Seymour is an Assistant Professor of Fashionable Technology and Director of the Fashionable Technology Lab at Parsons The New School for Design. She is an entrepreneur and conceptual researcher focusing on the next generation of wearables and the intertwining of aesthetics and function in our “second skin”.  She is described as being an innovator, visionary, trend setting, holistic in her approach, and a lateral thinker and has been involved in wearables for almost two decades. moondial.com

Hannah Knafo, MA is a doctoral candidate of Clinical Psychology, in her third year of the PhD program. Her dissertation research focuses on the intergenerational transmission of body image dissatisfaction from mothers to their daughters in middle childhood. Hannah is a Student Advisor for The New School for Social Research, and a lab manager at The Center for Attachment Research, directed by Drs. Howard and Miriam Steele. She is currently training as a therapist at The New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute and The New School Counseling Center.

Wendy D’Andrea, assistant professor of psychology at The New School, received her doctorate at the University of Michigan and completed her postdoctoral work with Bessel van der Kolk at The Trauma Center. Her expertise is in the area of the psychophysiology of complex trauma exposure. In particular, Dr. D’Andrea’s lab examines the physiological mechanisms associated with the loss of affective and self-awareness, and the consequences of blunted affect on cognitive and social functioning.

People: Hannah Knafo, Miriam SteelePaul AmitaiSabine Seymour, Steven Freed, Susan Ryan, Wendy D’Andrea
Tags: Computational Fashion, Fashion, psychology, wearable tech