video

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Noisefields uses a Video Sequencer to switch between two video sources to create flickering effects in a self-reflexive interplay of visual input. The imagery presented refers to its detecting of electronic signals and does not carry any other information, except that the Colorizer is used for variation. The circular form introduces a simple division into an inner and an outer field of interrelated pulsation, so that on the whole, the "content" of this work is an audiovisual modulation of "video noise."  This piece was exhibited at Eyebeam Atelier as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition.

Project Created: 
March 2003
 
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Trevor (1999) features manipulated video footage of musician Trevor Wishart which is manipulated to electronically slur his words into unrecognizable stutters or stretched out abstract sound. Attempts to
understand what he is trying to communicate are frustrated as both he and the viewer are
subjected to digital control. The incomprehensible utterances begin to seem like a rhythm that highlights correspondences between seeing and hearing, while drawing viewers’ attention to their own expectations about performance and installation.  This work was exhibited as part of What Sound Does a Color Make at Eyebeam Atelier.

Project Created: 
March 2003
 
Projects: Trevor
People: Steina Vasulka
Project Type: Exhibited Project
Tags: video

I am chairing a panel this Wednesday at the CUNY Graduate Center

CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street
March 17th 2010, Wednesday, 7:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100)

 

My good friend and colleague, Wafaa Bilal, will be speaking this Wednesday at the San Francisco Art Institute. I’d highly recommend the talk.

wafaa

You might remember him from the “Shoot an Iraqi” project where he lived in a gallery for a month and had a paint ball gun setup to point at him. You could shoot him with the gun for $1 (I couldn’t resist spending a couple bucks).

 

New documentation! During my 6-month residency at Eyebeam, I worked on about 6 different projects. Two of them: Hatch and After Thought are now documented on my site.

hatch_2

Hatch is the first of a series of acrylic plexiglass installations. This one depicts a mass of sperm (up to 200!) which swarm around a doorway. This was cut with the Eyebeam’s lasercutter, can be site-specific in its installation, and is cheap to ship.

 

We have just uploaded the video documentation for one of the most interesting Upgrade events we had in the past year with Biella Coleman and Zach Lieberman discussing the tensions within the Free Software / Open Source world(s?) on the meaning of “free”. It explores the tensions between ethics and pragmatics, between “to free” and “to open”, between means and ends. If you’re interested in these issues I really recommend you check it out:

 

Edit (see comments): To view the video in other formats (other than the Flash player), visit the video’s page in Blip.tv.

 

MAKE, CRAFT and Maker Faire were sponsors of the Fairytale Fashion show 2010 with Diana Eng , here's Phil Torrone's video!

 

Adafruit attended the Fairytale Fashion show 2010 with Diana Eng, here’s our video – above in glorious HD (m4v here).

 
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CHERYL is a four-person video and performance collective based in Brooklyn that explores the themes of mortality, mania, the feline-human connection, the limits of shoulders, the flammability of dollar-store hair extensions, and the staining power of fake blood. Through themes ranging from topical to bizarre, the CHERYLs revel in the joyous power of dance-induced psychosis/euphoria. CHERYL has been bringing its particular brand of FRESHMAGICK™ to New York City since colonial times, and has since acquired a dedicated cult following and media attention for over-the-top happenings involving outrageous costumes, exuberant dance moves, and participatory dance floor suicide.

Eyebeam CV
2010FExhibiting Artist
S
 
People: Stina Puotinen, Sarah Van Buren, Nick Schiarizzi, Destiny Pierce
Tags: video, performance, MIXER: OLYMPIAD, mixer, CHERYL
Book Details
Format: 
Paperback, 208 pages
Publication Date: 
May 2007
ISBN: 
978-0262532884
Category: 
History
In Stock: 
no
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

The cinematic has been a springboard for the work of many influential artists, including Victor Burgin, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Stan Douglas, Nan Goldin, Douglas Gordon, Cindy Sherman, and Jeff Wall, among others. Much recent cinema, meanwhile, is rich with references to contemporary photography. Video art has taken a photographic turn into pensive slowness; photography now has at its disposal the budgets and scale of cinema. This addition to Whitechapel's Documents of Contemporary Art series surveys the rich history of creative interaction between the moving and the still photograph, tracing their ever-changing relationship since early modernism.

 
Tags: photo, video, Film
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