Second Life


the aesthetics of pain

http://www.alansondheim.org/battleship.mp4
http://www.alansondheim.org/battle.mp4

what occurs on flatness never curls inward towards the body: that is
unless a fundamental identification is at work. nothing of the sort in
futurism which is responsible for the clean and proper body of the
Mac and Apple, the sliver that cuts through flesh, everything acceptable,
horror against against horror in false topologies, topographies of
destroyed villages, torn flesh, mutilated faces. it is all one and it is

 

I started Eyebeam as a resident on Thursday, receiving a keycard. On Friday, I talked with Marko and found the card didn't work; I would have come in this weekend otherwise - I was hoping to work with Jackson and his cube. This afternoon I received a call from my brother who said that my father was dying, my aunt had cancer. Earlier in the week we had ceiling leaks in our place in Brooklyn, from Hurricane Irene; they were in the middle of the room and created a mess. It's been a rough week. My recent work has been concerned with the relationship of the virtual to the real - in particular the messy virtual, the way that wounding or pain or death within the virtual resonates with us. Death is inescapable, in spite of what Wired magazine says, and in dying we are for the first and last time absolutely, unutterably, alone; the journey is not a journey but a finitude we own for the split second before we descend into oblivion.

 

Yesterday, Victoria Scott, my collaborator on the Gift Horse — a 13-foot high sculpture of the Trojan Horse — managed the installation of the giant sculpture for ArtMRKT San Francisco, from May 19th-May 22nd. Who wasn’t there? That’s right, me — I was busy installing my “2049″ exhibition at The Dump — and am so thankful that Victoria was able to run this one out.

 

Today we shifted to the virus-making portion of Gift Horse, where anyone can assemble a virus sculpture to be placed inside the belly of the Trojan Horse. The gesture is to gather people in real space, give them a way to hand-construct their “artwork” and to hide hundeds of the mini-sculptures inside the horse.

The first virus to go inside, the Rat of the Chinese zodiac, was The Andromeda Strain, an imaginary virus from the film. This father-daughter team cut, folded and glued the paper sculpture together and she did the honors of secreting it inside the armature.

 

After the first month, we are 31% funded on the 13-foot-high Gift Horse for the 01SJ Biennial. A good initial run, but its starting to feel a little tight, so please consider a Kickstarter donation to the Gift Horse project.

gift_horse_3d

We have been busy working on the internal structure and final models in Sketchup. The skeleton proved to be an advanced wood project since the exterior printed digital panels (see model above) will be exactly fitted to make it look like giant-sized 3D model of a horse.

 

Invisible Threads is featured in “Esse, Nosse, Posse/Common Wealth for Common People” – an online exhibition by the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Athens, Greece. Curated by Daphne Dragona, the show aims to focus on the new forms of labor as well as on the new values and costs emerging in the new connected reality it represents.

Contributing artists and theorists include Burak Arikan & Engin Erdogan, Nicholas Knouf, Jamie Wilkinson , Aaron Koblin & Daniel Massey, Geert Lovink, MediaShed, Molleindustria, Kate Rich and Trebor Scholz.

www.emst.gr/commonwealth

 

Last night I saw Life 2.0, a new film by a friend of mine, Jason Spingarn-Koff, which follows three storylines of people heavily involved in Second Life, an environment that I use in many artworks. As a veteran SL user and ex-documentary producer, I was deeply impressed.

Life2_filmstill1_am1-550x348

 
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