So Manu Sporny (in)famously open sourced his genome by posting it to Github a year and a half ago and he writes extensively about his reasons on his website.

I downloaded his file and ran it through my Stranger Visions software today to generate my take on his face. You can see a side by side comparison of my generated face and his actual face (well pulled from google image search results) below.


I am still very much in the middle of my wetlab work for Stranger Visions but the software side – the part that takes DNA information and produces a 3d model of a face – is mostly complete. I thought I would talk a little bit about the software and the concept of inductive bias in this next installment on Stranger Visions. This is a slightly technical post but there is a kind of ethical question  at the end…


Thanks to everyone who made it out to Eyebeam Open Studios! For those who didn’t, here are some pictures of my installation at the event. ALSO Stranger Visions is now up in a snazzy presentation in the Eyebeam bookstore/lobby til August, check it out if you are in Chelsea. (and consider donating to Eyebeam’s kickstarter campaign if you like their work!)

View as you enter Eyebeam Project Space.


As many of you probably already know I have been working hard over the past 6 months on a new project Stranger Visions. I am working on the piece as a resident at Eyebeam and in collaboration with the DIY bio lab, Genspace in downtown Brooklyn. I recently gave a LISA talk describing this piece and I thought I would elaborate on some of the details from my presentation through a series of blog posts. In this post I will describe where the idea behind Stranger Visions  came from and how I am producing it in general terms. Future posts will delve into more details about lab work, 3d programming, 3d printing and ethics.



In Stranger Visions artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material collected in public places. Working with the traces strangers unwittingly leave behind, Dewey-Hagborg calls attention to the impulse toward genetic determinism and the potential for a culture of genetic surveillance.

Project Created: 
May 2012

Future Archaeology is premiering a new work – “moc.elgooG”
A situated net art experiment in subverting power dynamics of internet search.
Opening Friday 7pm – late at Splatterpool gallery in Williamsburg 138 Bayard St.



Well there is a less than stellar review of the show I am in at Grounds for Sculpture in last Friday’s New York Times.

Another promising work is Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s “Totem” (2010), a gypsum tower that records visitors’ conversations and spits them out in fragmented form over the course of the exhibition. Unfortunately, the fragments of speech returned by the sculpture feel so random — and are so hard to hear — that the piece fails to connect human speech, meaning and technology in a profound fashion.


A few events coming up worth noting. This friday 8pm – midnight there will be a rebroadcast of Future Archaeology‘s audience participatory performance of Ohm at the Index Festival. You can catch it on TV Time Warner channel 57 or join us at the rebroadcast party (same time) at Silvershed 119 w. 25th st. PH in Manhattan.

Sept. 1st at noon I will be discussing my work at an art salon benefit for Grounds for Sculpture in NJ. The tickets are $60 and include a fancy lunch and glass of wine. Call (609) 586-0616 for tickets. This is also pretty much your last chance to see Totem (who has been evolving all summer) installed at Grounds for Sculpture as the exhibit comes down shortly after on 9/18.

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