open source

Start Date: 
23 Sep 2010
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
New York Hall of Science
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The Open Hardware Summit will be a venue to discuss and draw attention to the vibrant open source hardware movement currently happening. The event is happening around MakerFaire NY, in partnership with Buglabs, MakerFaire, Creative Commons, littleBits, Eyebeam, Htink.

With an amazing lineup from academia, industry, DIY shop and open hardware stars, the event promises to be incredible. The lineup includes: Arduino, Sparkfun, Evil Mad Science, Adafruit, Make, NASA, MITre, Eyebeam, OHANDA, Creative Commons, Texas Instruments, DIYLILCNC, FSF and many others.

For the full schedule, please visit: www.openhardwaresummit.org/schedule.
Tickets are at $40, and $25 for students, artists and non-profits. Tickets include breakfast, lunch, and cocktail, free one day pass to Maker Faire and a geeky goodiebag!

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 
Start Date: 
3 Sep 2009
Hours: 
7PM-9PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
The Change You Want To See
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Partner Organizations: 
The Change You Want to See
Not An Alternative

Upgrade! NY continues its series on open source as it relates to activism and creative practice with a conversation between Larisa Mann and Karl Fogel followed by a DJ set by Larisa Mann (aka DJ Ripley). The discussion will examine how Jamaican music has developed in the absence of an effective copyright regime, how technological and social conditions affect the music and musicians, and then will compare this to the open source movement today. They’ll look at how changes in technology and social convention affect music, software, and culture in general.

 
Research: Open Culture
Tags: Upgrade!, open source, Events, copyright
Partner Organizations: The Change You Want to See

I’ve been teaching a class on the subject for 3 years, I’ve been giving talks on the subject for almost a year. Finally I set down and wrote the essay for the second edition of the Collaborative Futures book. On Sunday (Aug 1st 2010) I gave a talk based on this essay at DebConf the Debian community conference. The title of the talk is “Beyond Sharing: Open Source Design”. The (high-pitch audio) presentation is available on the Debian site (requires Firefox or another OGV playing browser).

 

Be a part of history! Support the cause and open source fabrication. Pledge now!

Laser cutters are a key technology for making things.

Remember when people couldn't make their own videos, CDs or print out photos? Me neither (at least we try to forget). In many areas of media, the last century was quite the read-only culture where a few gatekeepers would sit on the means to produce everything. Not the best situation for creativity or for people with lots of cool ideas but no cash.

How can you help? Your pledge is what makes this project possible and the more funded the community, the faster we can make this happen.

 

Design by Ange Tran

Please join Not An Alternative, Eyebeam Art & Technology Center, and Upgrade! NY, this Thursday, June 10 for the opening of Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus, an exhibition which examines models of participation and participation as a model in art and activism.

 
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Hacking Couture is a platform for launching new fashion creations through an open source approach of reverse engineering fashion brands and making the code available online. Hands on workshops encourage participants to create using the codes regardless of their level of fashion knowledge, and to engage in the larger fashion conversation. By understanding the coding of established fashion, this project provides a platform to empower participants to step up and create.

Project Created: 
May 2006
 
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SADbot (The Seasonally Affected Drawing Robot) is a solar powered, interactive drawing machine for the Eyebeam window gallery in New York City. It uses two 18.5'' x 13'' solar panels to power two stepper motors which allow the control of a pen in two dimensions.

SADbot also takes input from people walking outside, by using a set of sensors which can tell how much light they're getting (photocells) and putting them up against the inside of the window, SADbot knows if someone is covering up one of the sensors, and can change its drawing behavior accordingly.

The window gallery doesn't get any direct sunlight, so we set up an array of mirrors on the roof of Eyebeam to direct sunlight to a fixed mirror hanging off the roof to reflect light down to the solar cells in the gallery window. The solars cells, in turn, power the motors to run the drawing machine.

Project Created: 
May 2010
 

The Internets is all buzzing with chatter against Facebook’s latest privacy breaches. Into this happy mix a bunch of NYU students have been cast as the Davids against the social networking Goliath. Is that really a good thing? Can we help?


Friends are there... or are they?

Diaspora is a new initiative by 4 NYU students to create a “privacy aware, personally controlled, do-it-all distributed open source social network” by the end of the summer. A worthy mission indeed with quite an ambitious time line.

 
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