media

Project MUSE Journals Theatre Journal Volume 62, Number 4, December 2010

Review of Reid Farrington's Gin & "It." (review)

 

Taxes are probably one of the most stressful and depressing times of year, am I right? In an attempt to gleam a bit of useful and, dare I say, Interesting information from the annual mundane task, Google has partnered up with Eyebeam to create the “Data Viz Challenge”

 

Google has thrown its support behind a contest that searches for ways to map out the U.S. government's esoteric spending patterns. Called "Data Viz Challenge," the contest has been assembled by the Eyebeam Art and Technology Center, a digital-arts collective headquartered a stone's throw from Google's Manhattan satellite office, and promises $5,000 to the entrant who can best "visualize how your individual federal income taxes are spent."

 

Datamining Hip-Hop’s History

* By Duncan Geere Email Author
* February 20, 2011 |
* 7:41 pm |
* Categories: Crowdsourcing, Media
*

An artist named Tahir Hemphill wants to datamine 30 years of hip-hop lyrics to provide a searchable index of the genre’s lexicon.

 

Take a Tour of Chelsea-Based Art Group's Eclectic Holiday Mixer
Oresti /NITESIDE

Amanda McDonald Crowley, executive director of non-profit Eyebeam, walks us through the group's unconventional holiday mixer over the weekend at the art and technology center's Chelsea digs. The merry mixer -- thrown by trendy event group Mean Red -- was host to interactive art, DIY gifts, a book launch and even several seven-deadly-sins-themed snowglobes.

 

The Brian Lehrer Show
The Great Urban Hack
Thursday, November 04, 2010

John Keefe, WNYC's senior executive producer for news, talks about this weekend's Great Urban Hack, an event to promote the intersection of journalism and technology. The over-night, open-source "hackathon" is being co-sponsored by WNYC.

 

If you're walking around bustling New York City, it's probably not with an open laptop. But if you were... you might notice the five USB flash drives that Aram Bartholl installed into walls and columns around the city. The small ports wait for someone to walk by, plug in a laptop, and drop off or pick up some files.

Simple as that.

 

by Don_Caldwell on Monday, Nov 01, 2010

Limewire may be dead, but if you are in NYC you can still share files, and you don’t even need to connect to the Internet.

 

By Jeroen Beekmans | Published: Saturday October 30, 2010

Aram Bartholl, also known as the man behind Speed Show, has launched a new project in New York City which is part of his Eyebeam residency. Under the name of ‘Dead Drops’, he created an anomymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space by ‘injecting’ USB flash drives into publicly accessible walls, buildings and curbs.

 
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