eyebeam

While he was in town for the opening of his current exhibition—Lifecycle, the artist Jeff Soto painted a striking piece on the façade of Chelsea's EYEBEAM, just around the corner from the gallery, at 540 West 21st Street. Many thanks to the fine folks at EYEBEAM for their neighborly support, and the incredible work they do.

 

The most important role of gloves in Mary Mack 5000 is to measure the accuracy of the claps. The technology must be able to assess whether or not the correct claps are being made at the correct time.

I first started out mapping out all possible clapping combinations.

 

The student residents of Eyebeam have at last left the building.
Our residency came to a close with the start of Open Studios, a small
reception in our honor was organized after the first day of open
studios.

Eyebeam has supplied us with endless possibilities, and as we left
leaving plenty of watering eyes and smiling faces we enter the world
equip with an entirely different set of perspectives; all thanks to
Eyebeam.

We've enjoyed our stay as student residents though we're positive this
wont be the last you'll see of us.

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A molecular gastronomer and environmental artist team up to make diners reconsider the source of their food and the impacts of their eating habits

[Published 2nd July 2010 03:17 PM GMT]

The first dinner of the Cross (x) Species supper club last Saturday straddled science, environmentalism and performance art.

 

Eyebeam's Student Resident program is a school-year long digital arts and technology program for New York City public high school students who are interested in experimenting, learning, and creating with new technology tools.

During the program Student Residents work with Eyebeam fellows and residents as collaborators and mentees, learn to work with new tools for creative practice, and create individual and group projects. The student residents come to us through our summer youth program, Digital Day Camp and from there, are invited to apply to the student resident program.

 

Girls Eye View this year was deep. 

In the end, we ended up with these two short animations, made by two wonderful young women. Along the way, we experimented with lots of media and writing; and talked a LOT about these words, and why they are meaningful to each of us.

If you want to know the story behind these videos, see this blog post.

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Friday and Saturday mark our final days walking the halls at Eyebeam. I can't believe it's finally coming to an end. Who knew eleven months would go that fast? And what are we ending it with? A fucking bar table. 

Anyway, instead of getting caught up in the present, let's take a trip down memory lane, the highlights of my stay at Eyebeam. 

Diana Eng! Fairytale Fashion! 

 
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For the 2009 Holiday Hackshop, Eyebeam asked the current Student Residents to create an eyebeam-themed installation for their window gallery. In the holiday spirit, they designed An Eyebeam Nativity, which recreated the nativity scene using the founding principals, technologies, and people of Eyebeam as a basis for the design.

The center piece was "Baby Eyebeam" (in the place of baby jesus) and it represented the melding of technology, the arts, and bright ideas. Surrounding the baby were the three wise men played by Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Linus Torvalds; and with Ada Lovelace in the role of Mary. The whole scene was bordered by the different aspects of art/tech culture - ranging from Pokeman as the North star, to a digitally generated wreath, to a pile of old T.V.s for "snow."

Project Created: 
January 2010
 

Starting tomorrow morning and for the next 3 days we will work on a new edition of the Collaborative Futures book.

As I’ve done before I will keep updating with posts here every evening. In the meanwhile I will leave you with the spiel:

In January 2010 six authors and one programmer were locked in a room in Berlin and were assigned by the Transmediale festival to collaboratively write a book titled “Collaborative Futures”.

5 days and 33,000 words later the first incarnation of Collaborative Futures was finished online, and sent off to be printed. 5 months later the original authors together with three new people and will be locked in Berlin and New York to produce the second edition of the same book.

 
Projects: ShiftSpace, The Upgrade!, youarenothere, Collaborative Futures
People: Mushon Zer-Aviv
Research: Middle East, Open Culture
Tags: in English, collaboration, collaborative futures, eyebeam, flossmanuals, Re:Group, transmediale, honorary resident
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