eyebeam

http://www.eyebeam.org/events/beyond-the-joystick-introduction-to-altern... I am running this workshop series weekly on Tuesday Evenings for 6 weeks, starting on June 28 to Aug 2 at Eyebeam. It’s basically for artists, designers and hobbyists interested in starting to think about and explore alternative physical interfaces that can be used in games, toys or interactive art projects. We’ll be learning about using the Arduino and some Processing with various sensors and switches to make simple, but effective controllers. This area is a big part of my practice so I am really excited about sharing it!

 

At Blip Festival, the People are Almost as Cool as the Music

Leigh Alexander —At Blip Festival, the People are Almost as Cool as the MusicThe first thing I thought about this morning, as I opened my eyes, was that the cat trying to rouse me from my hung-over sleep sounded like a Game Boy.

The second thing is that I had a really, really good time at the opening show night of Blip Festival 2011 last night.

This year's Blip Festival was thrown at Eyebeam on New York City's West Side by a collective of chip musicians called 8bitpeoples, with help from NYC nonprofit The Tank.

 

New concepts and emerging technologies have always had a significant effect on art, a fact that became almost endemic in the twentieth century. Whether it’s the emergence of cinema, video, or the internet, technology has become increasingly integral to artistic production. The Eyebeam Art and Technology Center, a non-for-profit space in Chelsea, is dedicated to exploring the continuously evolving relationship of contemporary art and design to technology. Often presenting a heterogeneous and even dizzying array of works, this space is always a fun visit. Now through January 29, Eyebeam will be presenting X-lab, an open house lab that lets the public sneak a peek into what the center's residents and fellows are up to. Featuring the work of Aaron Meyers, Brooke Singer, and Jacob Ciocci and numerous others.

~ Yván A. Rosa

 

On Friday, I figured out the doorbell receiver signals and how arduino can tell which doorbell is being rung. Here is the project list which helps me code but also know exactly what goes where. MODE INTERFACE BUTTONS ARDUINO SOUNDS 1. Rest Start Button which goes to Intro Show screenshot of last game Start button Nothing Background loops 2. Intro Intro background Show 2 streaming videos Wait for snapbutton Timer to 3 mins then returns to Rest Exit button Exit button Snapbutton Introduction! 3. Game Game background Timer runs for 30 sec Has 2 pics of players Score If there has been a previous hit the snap shot from the prev hit if game has ended then go to ScoreMail 2 streamed video off screen Exit button Exit button Doorbell signals Hit Me! Game Loop 4. Hit Takes snapshot from whatever stream puts it on the screenshot Who did hit If judge adds points then show total points score from hit return to game Exit button Exit button Judge point input Ding ding ding 5.

 

I finally purchased the equipment to make the two wireless cameras feed simultaneously into processing.I am using the following set up: 2 x Wireless Security Kit from Geeks.com (they work on different channels around 2.4Ghz) XLR8 XtraView USB (composite video to USB adapter using, driver that comes with it) Canopus ADVC-55 (composite video to firewire adapter, no driver necessary)

 

I will be showing Hit Me! at the next Eyebeam Mixer. I am really excited about it. I need to do some updating to the game. Here is a list of intended updates: 1. Better wireless pin-hole cameras. For the game, I need 2 cameras that are same but run on different channels. I found some rechargeable ones at Geeks that have a choice of 4 different channels around the 2.4 Ghz frequency. Unfortunately I won’t know how the system would run in a space until I actually try it out. There are always going to be things that run on the 2.4 Ghz range, as well as the 900 Mhz range that my older cameras ran on. In the Chelsea Museum show, the old cameras conflicted with the project that was running right before mine, but it worked fine as soon as the previous project was turned off. So I am looking forward to getting them quick to try out in the space. 2. Better doorbell system. For the game, I need 2 that run on different channels like the cameras, but they can share the same receiver.

 

These are step by step instructions for how to use the laser cutters at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center. It’s posted here because I used a lot of laser cut parts for the projects in my book while I was a resident there, and from now on ‘beamers and others can use this as a quick reference.

First things first: join the laser@eyebeam.org list. It’s a good place to ask for help or tips, and alert others if something goes wrong. Roddy handles coordinating the laser lens hand-offs, and Marko is the technical person in charge if things go wrong.

24 hours (or more) before:

  1. Use the inventory checkout system to reserve the laser machine AND a lens. Arrange with Roddy to get the lens (usually he’ll just leave it on his desk).
  2. Reserve a time slot on the Equipment Rooms and Machine Reservations Google calendar

Day of: Inspection and Setup

 
People: Dustyn Roberts
Tags: eyebeam

Good news. I am extremely grateful for this opportunity to continue building games. I hope X-lab gets continued somehow, and I hope to introduce some workshop ideas soon!

 

I have been obviously neglecting my blog for the last few months, but I assure you there is a good reason — X-lab! X-lab was sort of a work-in-progress exhibition in the main space at Eyebeam. So imagine the gallery usually for finished works, filled up instead with artists working on their projects, engaging with the public during gallery hours. I used to space to set up Ninja Shadow Warrior and to build the physical game, as well as used the generous table space to work on improving Mary Mack 5000. It was wonderful meeting people, watching people try out the game, and getting feedback. This is kind of the most ideal situation for designing and making games, I think. Anyways, there was a tumblr site set up for X-lab where I would post some entries of how my work had been progressing. Hence the neglect of my blog! I will see if I can transfer some of the content to this blog. Update: I was able to add the posts from X-lab on earlier posts here.

 
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