DNA

Well there is a less than stellar review of the show I am in at Grounds for Sculpture in last Friday’s New York Times.

Another promising work is Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s “Totem” (2010), a gypsum tower that records visitors’ conversations and spits them out in fragmented form over the course of the exhibition. Unfortunately, the fragments of speech returned by the sculpture feel so random — and are so hard to hear — that the piece fails to connect human speech, meaning and technology in a profound fashion.

 

A few events coming up worth noting. This friday 8pm – midnight there will be a rebroadcast of Future Archaeology‘s audience participatory performance of Ohm at the Index Festival. You can catch it on TV Time Warner channel 57 or join us at the rebroadcast party (same time) at Silvershed 119 w. 25th st. PH in Manhattan.

Sept. 1st at noon I will be discussing my work at an art salon benefit for Grounds for Sculpture in NJ. The tickets are $60 and include a fancy lunch and glass of wine. Call (609) 586-0616 for tickets. This is also pretty much your last chance to see Totem (who has been evolving all summer) installed at Grounds for Sculpture as the exhibit comes down shortly after on 9/18.

 

This week my collaborative Future Archaeology will be featured in the Index Festival.

First we will be participating in the Make Ready panel August 17th 7-8pm at Harvestworks.

 

A short video document of my work at jaaga edited by artist in residence Clemence Barret.

Jaaga Dhvani from barret clemence on Vimeo.

 

Beginning to post some documentation here.

Hoping to get more images and a documentary video from Jaaga soon…

 

Come out to Jaaga July 1st at 7:30pm!

Jaaga Dhvani is a new work of Sound Art by New York-based artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg.

Jaaga Dhvani is quite literally the voice of a space – a sonic representation of the Jaaga art center imagined as a living corporeal entity.

Jaaga Dhvani is also a voice from space – the space around us in both our immediate and vast conceptions of place; an exploration of Jaaga , Bangalore, and India more generally as a site of collision between the global and the local, the high and the low tech, the very old and the very new.

 

Here are a few verses the algorithm generated today. I especially enjoy the first one as two of my good friends are getting married today in California (congrats Dan and Ellie! sorry it’s not more upbeat…)

joyously the bridal garland
perish too thy hated name and
warlike steed and throw the dart
dear in joy and part in silence

and their faces ran with blood of
earth loving sons your virtues prove
arjun and on kuru’s king and
lost him to restore the kingdom

larger stouter is this kuru
bowing to her weeping sister
bright celestial cars in concourse
lightninglike it came on karna

render honour to thy king and
lost himself and all was still and
torn not the deep and deadly sound
heaving sobs convulsed her bosom

 
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Adam Zaretsky is an artist, or "bioartist," working as a research affiliate in Arnold Demain's Laboratory for Industrial Microbiology and Fermentation in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Biology. He received a master of fine arts degree in 1999 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he studied and researched with "transgenic" artist Eduardo Kac. Since then, he has worked with such pioneers of bio-art as Joe Davis, Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr. Zaretsky will also teach an art and biology studio class in fall 2001 as a visiting artist at San Francisco State University.

Eyebeam CV
2006FTeaching Artist
STeaching Artist
 
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