collaboration

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Jason Euren is an anthropology graduate student at The New School for Social Research. He is researching the political life of hackerspaces and is interested in exploring the ways emerging collaborative social forms are enabling new kinds of democratic participation. In addition to supporting programming staff and artists, he is also conducting a research project investigating the role of 'collaboration' within Eyebeam.

Eyebeam CV
2012F
SIntern
2011FIntern
SIntern
 
Book Details
Format: 
Paperback, 188 pages
Publication Date: 
August 2010
ISBN: 
978-0984475018
Category: 
Artist Produced
Category: 
Design
Category: 
Theory/Criticism
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

The expanded second edition of Collaborative Futures has been completed and is now available for purchase, online reading, and for your contribution . Collaborative Futures is a collaboratively authored book about the theory and practice of collaboration, with a focus on social media and peer-production. The true nature of collaborative culture as a form of creative expression in the context of digital and network technologies has remained elusive, a buzzword often falling prey to corporate and ideological interests.

 
Projects: Collaborative Futures 2nd Edition
People: Sissu Tarka, Mushon Zer-Aviv, Mike Linksvayer, Michael Mandiberg, Marta Peirano, kanarinka, Astra Taylor, Alan Toner, Adam Hyde
Tags: collaborative futures, collaboration

I am speaking on a CUNY Open Access Week panel on Open Access in the Arts, which includes lecture/presentations by Doug Geers, Nina Paley, and myself. There will be a full screening of Nina Paley’s Sita Sings the Blues to follow panel presentation.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 

Anil Dash just published an interesting post looking at the social implications of the code fork, and how it has changed from a huge contested point to a feature of the collaborated process:

“While Linus Torvalds is best known as the creator of Linux, it’s one of his more geeky creations, and the social implications of its design, that may well end up being his greatest legacy. Because Linus has, in just a few short years, changed the social dynamic around forking, turning the idea of multiple versions of a work from a cultural weakness into a cultural strength. Perhaps the technologies that let us easily collaborate together online have finally matured enough to let our work reflect the reality that some problems are better solved with lots of different efforts instead of one committee-built compromise.”

 
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A ticket for a trip is an object that gives you exclusive access to an unexplored place.  It is a mere piece of paper, but it carries imagination and anticipation of the future, of what new world it can unlock. The Ticket Machine is a Rube Goldberg type collaborative installation which is triggered with a drop of a coin. The machine then unveils different worlds, created by the collaborators, and finally produces a printed ticket. This installation was created during the Eyebeam Roadshow 2010 at 01SJ in San Jose. Collaborators include: James Stone, Randy Sarafan

Project Created: 
September 2010
 
People: james stone, Randy Sarafan, Kaho Abe
Project Type: Installation
Tags: Ticket Machine, roadshow, physical computing, collaboration, arduino
Partner Organizations:
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Cover to the 2nd Edition

"As new technologies come into play, people become less and less convinced of the importance of self expression. Teamwork succeeds private effort."

—Marshall McLuhan

Despite these words, the true nature of collaborative culture as a form of creative expression in the context of digital and network technologies has remained elusive, a buzzword often falling prey to corporate and ideological interests. This book was first created by 6 core collaborators, as an experimental five day Book Sprint in January 2010. Developed under the aegis of transmediale.10, this third publication in the festival's parcours series resulted in the initiation of a new vocabulary on the forms, media and goals of collaborative practice.

Project Created: 
September 2010
 
Projects: Collaborative Futures
People: Adam Hyde, Alan Toner, Astra Taylor, kanarinka, Marta Peirano, Michael Mandiberg, Mike Linksvayer, Mushon Zer-Aviv, Sissu Tarka
Research: Open Culture
Project Type: Activism, Design, Open Source, Web, Writing and Publishing
Tags: book, book sprint, booki, collaboration, creative-commons, flossmanuals, free culture, free software, networks
Partner Organizations:

I’ve been teaching a class on the subject for 3 years, I’ve been giving talks on the subject for almost a year. Finally I set down and wrote the essay for the second edition of the Collaborative Futures book. On Sunday (Aug 1st 2010) I gave a talk based on this essay at DebConf the Debian community conference. The title of the talk is “Beyond Sharing: Open Source Design”. The (high-pitch audio) presentation is available on the Debian site (requires Firefox or another OGV playing browser).

 
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