architecture

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Albert Chao addresses the intersection of technology and architecture. With a foundation in physical computing, interaction design and parametric modeling, his work explores the mapping of ephemeral experiences through fabricated objects and speculative design proposals. Albert is a recent graduate of a Media, Architecture and Computing MArch + MFA dual degree program at the University at Buffalo.

Eyebeam CV
2012FIntern
SIntern
 
Start Date: 
12 Jan 2012 - 4 Feb 2012
Hours: 
Gallery hours: 12PM–6PM, Tuesday–Saturday
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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The Spacepod is a chamber that projects auditory architecture around a listener.  Using an omnidirectional array of speakers, it produces a sensation of auditory surfaces using ambisonic localization, psychoacoustic cues, and parametric mapping. Effectively, one finds oneself navigating by ear a world in which every surface is covered in sound-emitting pores. The Spacepod functions as a sort of spacecraft that sends the listener flying through auditory spaces that would be impossible or prohibitive to construct physically, without any of the constraints of bodily mass.

The Spacepod was developed by staff technologist Jackson Moore in conjunction with the Eyebeam Sound Research Group.  It will be on display in the Eyebeam Main Space from January 12th - February 4th.

 
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Spacepod I, August 2011

The Spacepod is a chamber that projects auditory architecture around a listener.  Using an omnidirectional array of speakers, it produces a sensation of auditory surfaces using ambisonic localization, psychoacoustic cues, and parametric mapping. Effectively, one finds oneself navigating by ear a world in which every surface is covered in sound-emitting pores. The Spacepod functions as a sort of spacecraft that sends the listener flying through auditory spaces that would be impossible or prohibitive to construct physically, without any of the constraints of bodily mass.

Project Created: 
December 2011
 

[image from Mark Skwarek AR from my maquette]

just a little bit farther

 
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Flock House is a group of migratory, public, sculptural habitats that host on underused urban infrastructure as they move with the help of preexisting transportation routes: from barges to flat bed trucks to helicopters, they can easily catch a ride to the next destination while living off and providing for their surroundings.

Commencing in New York City and choreographed throughout urban centers in the United States and three planes of living (subterranean, ground, and sky) the shape and form of Flock House is inspired by current global human migration patterns. Built collaboratively upon reclaimed, redesigned, and rethought materials within a gift culture, Flock House sets out to inspire reinvention of mobile structures in a time when growing urban populations are faced with imminent environmental, political, and economic instability.

Project Created: 
October 2011
 
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Untitled Prototype (c) Nick Hornby 2011

What happens when you mix things together?   Do you make brown?  Or do you make explosions, or riots, or Chords and triads, Pop-art, or postmodernism?  

Project Created: 
February 2011
 
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Carolina Vales (b1982) lives and works in Mexico City.  A graduate in  Architecture from the Universidad Iberoamericana in 2007, Mexico City, she has participated on urban projects for the Venice Bienal, the Sao Paulo Bienal and a Holcims Awards Foundation competition and worked with De Yturbe Arquitectos for urban design projects. She is currently living in New York where she is working with Nick Hornby on a series of new sculptures and architectural pavilions considering the intersection of art and design: sculpture, furniture, interior and urban design.

 

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SIntern
 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Audiovisual technology has returned to spectacle. Artists are armed with new technologies for fusing space and image, sound and sight. What they tend not to have is permanent spaces. And that lack of venues has made audiovisual artists nomadic and provisional, constrained to hastily-provisioned, rectangular, sometimes dim projections. In short, for revolutions to happen, you do need special venues, not just special artists.

 
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The Sentient City Survival Kit is a design research project that explores the social, cultural and political implications of ubiquitous computing for urban environments. It takes as its method the design, fabrication and presentation of a collection of artifacts, spaces and media for survival in the near-future sentient city.

As computing leaves the desktop and spills out onto the sidewalks, streets and public spaces of the city, information processing becomes embedded in and distributed throughout the material fabric of everyday urban space. Pervasive/ubiquitous computing evangelists herald a coming age of urban information systems capable of sensing and responding to the events and activities transpiring around them. Imbued with the capacity to remember, correlate and anticipate, this “sentient” city is envisioned as being capable of reflexively monitoring our behavior within it and becoming an active agent in the organization of our daily lives.

Project Created: 
June 2010
 
 
People: David Benjamin, Soo-in Yang
Research: Sustainability
Tags: architecture, feedback, Open City, sustainability
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